Reimagine Your New Year

first_imgby, Dr. Bill ThomasTweet5Share8ShareEmail13 SharesBeen thinking about New Years. It is a strange — perhaps the strangest — of all American holidays. I mean really, what’s the point? It’s a new day, a new month, a new year. Big whoop-tee-doo.THINKING. New Years Day is January first. January? Where did the name of that month come from?JANUARYThis month is actually named for the Roman god of gates and doorways. More generally, Janus was also known as the god of endings and beginnings. Hmmmm. This is getting more interesting. From the wiki…In general:In ancient Roman religion and myth, Janus (Latin: Ianus, pronounced [ˈiaː.nus]) is the god of beginnings and transitions, thence also of gates, doors, passages, endings and time. He is usually depicted as having two faces, since he looks to the future and to the past. The Romans named the month of January (Ianuarius) in his honor.In particular:Janus looks after passages, causes actions to start and presides over all beginnings, and since movement and change are bivalent, he has a double nature, symbolised in his two headed image.Janus frequently symbolized change and transitions such as the progress of future to past, from one condition to another, from one vision to another, and young people’s growth to adulthood. He represented time, because he could see into the past with one face and into the future with the other.[38] Hence, Janus was worshipped at the beginnings of the harvest and planting times, as well as at marriages, deaths and other beginnings. Having jurisdiction over beginnings Janus had an intrinsic association with omens and auspices.Happy January first!For the past year I’ve had the pleasure of being an evangelizer for an important movement called Life Reimagined created by AARP to help people find new possibilities in life. Reimagination is something I’m very passionate about.If the Life Reimagined movement is going to be about the conscious reclamation of new beginnings, it would seem logical that our movement ought to “reimagine” the American secular holiday that resonates most fully with “fresh starts.” Yeah, that’s right — we are plotting to take over New Years.Woo. Hoo.This year’s “First Fest” will take place in my hometown of Ithaca, N.Y. Come and join us, we’d love to have you! It will feature local music, art, dance and food in ways that help people see past “RESOLUTIONS” and into “POSSIBILITIES.” It’s all about creating a life reimagined for yourself and for others. We think that, with your help, we can make this little festival into a national phenomenon. We can change our world and have a darn good time while we are doing so.Keep an eye out for posts from Nate Silas Richardson — he’s the musical genius who is reimagining American music in some pretty cool and unexpected ways. You’ll also get some insight into how we plan to make our “culture hack” a vibrant and enjoyable reality.Hey, maybe even old Janus will keep an eye (or four) on our project as well. He might just be feeling the need for a little reimagination for himself.Related PostsTweet5Share8ShareEmail13 SharesTags: 1914 First Fest Life Reimagined music New Year’slast_img read more

Humility

first_imgby, David Goff, ChangingAging ContributorTweet13Share21Share3Email37 SharesA great way to start this piece would be to say, “I haven’t much to say about this topic,” and leave it at that. But, I’m not that humble. I am, in that regard very much an elder-in-training. I want to reflect a moment on this subject because, despite my own inability to be quietly humble, I think that humility is a clear indicator of the presence of an elder. And like many other attributes related to ageing, this seems to be one that is in short supply. With your help, maybe we can slowly change that.I have, across from where I’m sitting with my laptop, a wooden bust carved by a Shona artist. The Shona are a tribe in Zimbabwa that started carving, primarily stone, in the late 60’s. They are notable for the beautiful and compelling carvings that usually capture the majestic spiritual power of nature. But, for some reason, the carver here took as his subject a human being, an elder of his people. Even at this distance, a few feet a way, around half the planet, in some other cultural time, I can see the compassion and humility the artist found in this old man’s eyes.He, the old man, is a presence in my life. He looks like Nelson Mandela, but he isn’t, instead he is an elder man, who looks out upon a world of dizzying complexity with a look that is deeply humble. Humility is prized amongst the Shona people. To them, it represents a kind of spiritual attainment, a deep apprehension of our place in the great continuum of Life. I like having him in my living room reminding me of what is truly important. But, his presence also asks something of me. I don’t get to just enjoy him. I don’t just get to take comfort in knowing that he exists somewhere, even if only in the imagination of the artist, I live with this visage of humility as a daily reminder of what it really is to take a place in Creation.Humility seems to come along with feeling connected. Am I willing to stop being so full of me, so befuddled by my existence that I am constantly striving for some imagined right place in line? Am I ready to give up aspiring to God knows what, to just be, to exist for existence’s sake, instead of my own? Not yet, but he reminds me, that I can, and that I inevitably will. I like the peace I see in his face. It is the peace that passeth all understanding. I see that ageing can bring an experiential knowledge of deep connection, a feeling that inspires and consoles me.Humility then, seems to ride the experience of connection. It isn’t an attribute of morality. It is informed by on-going experience, an experience, I might add, which is within us, as a species. I spend moments just looking at this old man, this image in my living room, who reminds me that seeing the whole is possible, transformative and deeply present. He stares back at me; when I look into his eyes, he looks into mine. I see the tears that never pass his eyes, and am reminded of the suffering in the world. I see the knowledge there, and am reminded that my life is an on-going lesson. I see the compassion of his look, and am reminded that being here is really something. His presence, by and large, with all of his humility, reminds me just how thankful I am, that I get to have this kind of multi-varied awareness.Humility often evades me. If I’m honest with myself, it’s a true indicator of my status as an elder-in-training. I don’t mind. I’ve got more to learn. Thankfully! Still staying humble, realizing the true lay of the land, is costing me some of the hubris I’ve been protecting myself with, while it is strengthening my trust in Life, my sense that I’m here for a purpose. I like that sensation; it strengthens me, and enables me to live more fully. I don’t understand it, but it seems, that the fuller I am of myself, the fuller I am also of Life. Humility is strangely a fullness of connection as much as it seems to be an emptiness. It is an acceptance I am learning.I’ve come to think that humility, the humbling of oneself, is not a denial of having a self, but a responsible placing of that self in a larger context of wholeness. I believe the elder is moving in that direction, and I am following.Related PostsFresh Air– For Youngsters Only?More reader comments on the Fresh Air controversy. There is this… There are a lot of hip grandmas who listen to Fresh Air…grandpas, too….cool young people will become cool old people if they live long enough. And even if they didn’t care about Old then, time comes they will be…THE TGB ELDERLAW ATTORNEY: How Wills FailOrrin Onken writes the twice-monthly TGB Elderlaw Attorney column in which he discusses legal issues of concern and interest to elders. He is an elderlaw attorney licensed to practice in the state of Oregon. He also keeps his own blog,…REVIEW: Tribes of Eden by Dr. Bill ThomasWith Tribes of Eden Bill has written classic tale of good and evil built on a solid, substantial world where elders are woven into the everyday fabric of life, valued for their experience, knowledge and wisdom – a story that needs to be repeated far and wide. Most of all,…Tweet13Share21Share3Email37 SharesTags: elder Elderhood humilitylast_img read more

Are You Keeping Secrets That Can Make You Sick

first_imgby, Tammy MarshallTweetShare29ShareEmail29 SharesDuring the past 20 years, I’ve worked as an executive in aging services, partnering with some of the best presidents and CEOs in the field. For the most part, we all slept soundly at night, the missions were strong, the culture was healthy, and satisfaction scores were good.Despite all of that success, there has been a gnawing inside of me that I can’t seem to shake. If I summarized that feeling into a word it would be hypocrite.A Sick Kind of AddictionHaving been on the speaker’s circuit for several years, each time I give a talk I find myself having to own all of the ways that long-term care (my industry) promotes a youth-addicted culture.In fact, maybe those of us in aging services are the worst when it comes to ageism. My mom used to say, “secrets make you sick.” At the time, that may have been her strategy for hearing all of the shenanigans my siblings and I were up to, but what she really was saying was to be aligned in your words, actions, and deeds so you never need to hold onto a secret.My ConfessionSo, right here and now, I confess: my secret is that I’ve been a bit of a hypocrite and I am ready to change that.It’s no secret that an estimated 1 million people reside in what we call “senior living” (assisted living, independent living, and memory care) in the U.S. These structures are usually not hard to miss—their exteriors typically resemble resorts or high-end apartment complexes with well-groomed landscaping, surrounded by a parking lot and prominently placed signage at the front.Ah yes, the signage, this is where the story begins.The signs proudly announce, typically in just a few words, the following: “older people, some with memory problems, live here.” Even self-proclaimed progressive operators describe their “senior living communities” as follows:55-plusActive AdultIndependent LivingAssisted LivingMemory CareWhat Are We Thinking?Not only are these signs grossly ageist, but they also border on violating a person’s protected health information, or PHI. But hey, we learned from the best, the medical model paradigm—the same culprit that named buildings “psychiatric centers.”In my opinion, these signs should be considered HIPAA violations. Here’s why: PHI is violated when information about a person is shared without their consent. A person’s age is PHI data, and putting up a sign that sign that says, “A 55-plus Community” is a data point breech about everyone living in that community. By that same token, a Senior Living Community sign may also be a breach.The grossest violations are the “Memory Care” signs, and worse yet are those that have “Home for the Memory Impaired” emblazoned on the front of a building for all to see. We have made it very clear, no secret here folks: people diagnosed with memory impairments live there, likely individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. Yet another HIPAA violation.Think About It This WayWhat would it be like to drive by your neighbor’s mailbox and instead of it reading “55 Rose Avenue,” it read “47-year-old; slightly overweight female with a sluggish thyroid” drop mail here. Or how about this on the mailbox out front: “children with Autism live here”? We wouldn’t stand for that but for some reason, we all tolerate it when it comes to older adults.Equally as perplexing is the label “Independent Living.” I can think of several million people who live independently, myself included, and there are no signs outside our doors advertising as such. America loves labels, so If we must have them why don’t we put up the rest of the signs for people who don’t live independently. They would simply read, “other people live here too.” Stupid.Are We Blind?While there may be a need for regulators to utilize these terms as nomenclature, this mindset appears to have bled so deeply into the fabric of our society that it violates blindingly obvious PHI—so much so that it has become a way to segregate older adults from society as a whole. The most egregious act of all.The truth is out. Let’s end the obsession with labels, take down our signs, and give back dignity.Originally published on Senior Living Housing ForumRelated Posts#Aging: Establishing A Business For Baby Boomers Calls For A Long-Distance RunWe welcome a new contributor to our ranks, Brenda Becker, an aging-services consultant. Brenda’s consultancy connects seniors with the resources they need. My husband loves to run. It all started, as it frequently does, when the numbers on the scale were a bit higher than he wanted to see. He…The DudeI’ve often said that “aging is a team” sport. It is also true that “changing aging” is a team sport. For the past six years I have enjoyed working with and learning from Kavan Peterson as he has shown me how our message of a new and better old age…Grateful Changemakers: ChangingAgingAll of ChangingAging’s performances, all of our advocacy, all of our innovation is driven at its core by love. Love is the driving force behind combating ageism.TweetShare29ShareEmail29 Shareslast_img read more

Early timerestricted feeding improves blood sugar control and blood pressure study shows

first_img Source:https://www.uab.edu/news/research/item/9433-etrf-improves-blood-sugar-control-and-blood-pressure-pilot-study-says May 10 2018A new pilot study conducted by UAB Department of Nutrition Sciences Assistant Professor Courtney Peterson, Ph.D., shows that eating early in the daytime and fasting for the rest of the day improves blood sugar control, blood pressure and oxidative stress, even when people don’t change what they eat.”We know intermittent fasting improves metabolism and health,” Peterson said. “However, we didn’t know whether these effects are simply because people ate less and lost weight.”Peterson and her colleagues decided to conduct the first highly controlled study to determine whether the benefits of intermittent fasting are due solely to eating less. The study was also the first to test a form of intermittent fasting called early time-restricted feeding (eTRF) in humans. eTRF involves combining time-restricted feeding -; a form of intermittent fasting wherein people eat in a 10-hour or shorter period each day -; with eating early in the day to be in alignment with the body’s circadian rhythms in metabolism; it is tantamount to eating dinner in the mid-afternoon and then fasting for the rest of the day.In the study, eight men with prediabetes tried following eTRF and eating at typical American meal times for five weeks each. On the eTRF schedule, the men each started breakfast between 6:30-8:30 each morning, finished eating six hours later, and then fasted for the rest of the day -; about 18 hours. Everyone finished dinner no later than 3 p.m. By contrast, on the typical American schedule, they ate their meals spread across a 12-hour period. The men ate the exact same foods on each schedule, and the researchers carefully monitored the men to make sure they ate at the correct times and ate only the food that the researchers gave them.Peterson and colleagues found that eTRF improved insulin sensitivity, which reflects how quickly cells can take up blood sugar, and it also improved their pancreases’ ability to respond to rising blood sugar levels. The researchers also found that eTRF dramatically lowered the men’s blood pressure, as well as their oxidative stress levels and their appetite levels in the evening.Related StoriesDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustHealthy blood vessels could help stave off cognitive declineNew ACC/AHA guidelines could improve detection of gestational hypertensionPeterson and colleagues’ research is important because it shows for the first time in humans that the benefits of intermittent fasting are not due solely to eating less; practicing intermittent fasting has intrinsic benefits regardless of what you eat. Also, it shows that eating early in the day may be a particularly beneficial form of intermittent fasting. Peterson hopes the research will also raise awareness of the role of the body’s internal biological clock -; called the circadian system -; in health.”Our data also indicate that our feeding regimen has to be synchronized with the circadian rhythm and our biological clock,” said Eric Ravussin, Ph.D., director of the Nutrition Obesity Research Center at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center.Ravussin served as a collaborator with Peterson on the study.”If you eat late at night, it’s bad for your metabolism,” Peterson said. “Our bodies are optimized to do certain things at certain times of the day, and eating in sync with our circadian rhythms seem to improve our health in multiple ways. For instance, our body’s ability to keep our blood sugar under control is better in the morning than it is in the afternoon and evening, so it makes sense to eat most of our food in the morning and early afternoon.”Peterson notes that her research sheds light on why intermittent fasting approaches that limit eating to the late afternoon and evening may have failed to find any benefits.These findings could lead to better ways to help prevent Type 2 diabetes and hypertension. In light of these promising results, Peterson says more research is needed on intermittent fasting and meal timing to find out how they affect health and to figure out what types of approaches are achievable for most people.last_img read more

Meaty snacks bring out the dark side of street dogs

first_img Email A dog caring for her litter of puppies may look like the ultimate altruist—especially if she’s malnourished and living on the streets of India. But beneath her heart-of-gold image lurks a dark side, scientists say, one that comes out instantly if someone offers her a bit of meat. Growling and snarling, she’ll snatch the meat from her pups and devour it alone, researchers report today. The findings, the team says, bolster the idea that the ancestors of dogs first joined humans as scavengers, not as puppies stolen from a wolf’s den.“We didn’t expect to see this kind of behavior from a mother,” says Manabi Paul, a behavioral ecologist at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) in Kolkata, India, and the lead author of the study. “Sometimes, a mother fought and bit her own pups to keep the meat for herself. She was telling them, ‘No, I will not give you any!’”Paul and her colleagues discovered the behavior while studying parental care in free-ranging dogs—that is, domesticated dogs that live on the streets. Such canines are common in India, where they’ve been part of city and village life since at least 2000 B.C.E., says study co-author Anindita Bhadra, a behavioral ecologist also at IISER. Despite the dogs’ long history with humans, scientists know very little about them. They are unsupervised by people, but they are still dependent on us for food—either through hand-outs or trash. “They do not see humans as part of their pack, but as a resource,” Bhadra says. The mothers are known for their parental care. Paul notes that juvenile puppies often stay with their moms even after they’re weaned, at about 7 weeks of age. But as the scientists observed the dogs, they spotted signs of classic parent-offspring conflicts: The mothers sometimes refused to suckle their pups or would fight with them over food. Behavioral ecologists say that such conflicts arise because although the mother wants her pups to survive, she also needs to restore her health so she can have another litter—thus maximizing her reproductive success.To find out whether human-provided food led to more mother-pup conflicts, Paul and her colleagues devised two experiments, each spanning the 5 weeks after most pups are done weaning. In one, twice a day over three consecutive days, Paul tossed biscuits to dogs in 15 different litters with one to seven puppies each. In the second experiment, she threw pieces of raw chicken to another 16 litters, again doing this twice a day for 3 days in a row for 6 weeks. 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Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Manabi PaulStreet dogs in IndiaFrom Paul’s videos of these feedings, the scientists calculated the amount of sharing and conflict within each litter, and quantified each mother’s level of conflict for each week. They found that in every litter, the mothers rarely let any pup have a scrap of meat. In the first week, when giving the litters biscuits, the mothers’ level of conflict was only 25% on the scientists’ scale. But the mothers’ conflict level over meat started at 80%, the scientists report. Some mothers were “so needy for meat, they would jump over their pups to grab each piece, and wouldn’t share a bit,” Paul says. But as the puppies matured, their mothers’ generous behavior with the biscuits also declined, the team reports online today in Royal Society Open Science. When mother dogs no longer share any food with their pups, the youngsters are considered fully weaned and are on their own.The mothers’ desperate play for the meat stems from their nutritional needs, the scientists say. Although dogs, unlike wolves, can digest carbohydrates, they still need protein. Lactating mothers and pups require a diet comprised of at least 28% protein.It’s that need for protein that may have led the ancestors of today’s dogs to separate from their packs and attach themselves to humans, Bhadra says. “Instead of leading to more cooperation among the ancestral wolf groups, the rich resources of human hunters may have induced them to split apart,” she says, a division that in time produced the dog. There was, thus, no need for people to take wolf puppies from their dens to domesticate; the canids joined people on their own, the authors speculate.Such a scenario is plausible, says Ádám Miklósi, a behavioral ethologist at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest. But he points out that when this “decline of cooperative tendencies” in dogs took place “is still an open question.”Miklósi and others nevertheless say the study sheds light on the little known lives of free-ranging dogs, especially their maternal behavior. “That behavior has not been studied in detail,” he says, “and it may be the key to understanding these dogs’ success.”“This study reminds us that dogs don’t live in a Disney-like fantasy world of doting moms and offspring,” adds Julie Hecht, an applied ethologist at City University of New York in New York City. “The conflict between mother dogs and their pups is real and complex.”This conflict may not be limited to street dogs, points out Monique Udell, a behavioral ecologist at Oregon State University, Corvallis. “It may be no coincidence that puppies are adopted into new homes at around 8 weeks of age,” she notes—the same age that the free-ranging mother dogs in India will bite their own offspring to grab a bit of meat.last_img read more

Svelte porpoises eat twice as much as humans to cope with the

first_img By Elizabeth PennisiDec. 6, 2018 , 6:00 PM Then, they monitored the movements and sounds made by 13 wild porpoises, which they tagged and tracked from 2012 to 2016. By listening to the porpoises’ breathing, they could calculate respiration rates—and used the captive porpoise energy use rate to determine how many calories they were burning.The animals took about three breaths per minute, and fewer in the summer, translating into an average burn of about 4300 calories per day, the researchers report today in the Journal of Experimental Biology. (Humans burn about 2000 calories a day.) Porpoises put on a lot of blubber in the summer, they add, likely helping them survive the winter in water that could kill a human in 15 minutes flat. Now we know why they never get fat. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Svelte porpoises eat twice as much as humans to cope with the cold Email Harbor porpoises should be the envy of any dieter. That’s because they eat a tremendous amount given their relatively small size, the equivalent of a 55-kilogram person. Their secret, according to a new study, is very high metabolic rates that let them burn more than twice as many calories per day than the average human. They need all this food to keep themselves from freezing to death in frigid arctic waters. Although that might not help dieting humans, it could help biologists better understand what these animals need to thrive.For years, biologists have argued over whether porpoises (above) have high metabolic rates. Sea otters and seals, other small mammals that spend much of their life in water, burn energy far faster than their land-lubber relatives. But data on porpoises were mixed, with some suggesting their metabolic rate was not that high, after all.So, researchers monitored the food intake and activity of three captive harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) for 3 years. They measured the animals’ breathing, determined how much of their fish diet was turned into blubber, and calculated how much energy they use up per breath. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Peter Verhoog/Minden Pictures last_img read more

Men need not apply university set to open jobs just to women

first_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Tania RabesandratanaJun. 18, 2019 , 10:05 AM Hero Images/Getty Images The plan was announced today and is already attracting controversy. “People say it’s illegal; they say we will lower standards. That’s a load of baloney,” Smits says. Some critics say the program discriminates against men. “Yes, absolutely,” Smits says. “For years, men have been discriminating against women, and women haven’t been paid the same as men for the same jobs.”The program offers 5-year tenure track positions with a €100,000 startup package to set up labs, along with a mentoring program and career opportunities for spouses.Dutch and EU laws allow policies to recruit underrepresented groups, TUE says. But across science, a gender gap persists: In 2011, women accounted for just one-third of all EU researchers, and, at the highest level of the academic career ladder, just 21% were women in 2013, according to the European Commission’s She Figures 2015 report.Biologist Isabelle Vernos, a group leader at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, Spain, prefers that jobs be open to everyone whenever possible. “But depending on the discipline, I understand that sometimes you need high-impact action to change a pattern,” adds Vernos, who is a member of CRG’s gender balance committee and chairs the European Research Council’s working group on the same topic.She worries TUE’s program could place a burden on female recruits, who may face suspicion about their abilities and anger about the process. CRG, she says, has tried a softer approach: No group leader is recruited until enough top female candidates are shortlisted. The number of group leaders who are women has doubled in the 2.5 years since this rule was introduced.Smits likens the new policy to Plan S, a radical mandate by a group of research funders to require immediate open access to scientific publications, which he co-created in his previous job as the commission’s director-general for research and innovation. “If you don’t take bold action, things will not improve,” he says, adding that he hopes the program will have a snowball effect on other university recruitment policies.TUE now has about 500 staff members and 150 permanent jobs will be up for grabs in the next 5 years. After 18 months, the university will review what percentage of vacancies will fall under this program.The program is named after Irène Joliot-Curie, the daughter of Marie Skłodowska-Curie, who received a joint Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1935. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Women account for just one-third of all researchers in the European Union. A Dutch engineering university is taking radical action to increase its share of female academics by opening job vacancies to women only.Starting on 1 July, the Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE) in the Netherlands will not allow men to apply for permanent academic jobs for the first 6 months of the recruitment process under a new fellowship program. If no suitable applicant has been found within that time, men can then apply, but the selection committee will still have to nominate at least one candidate of each gender.“We have been talking about [gender balance] for ages,” says TUE President Robert-Jan Smits. “All kinds of soft measures are taken and lip service is paid to it. But the stats still look awful.” Currently, 29% of TUE’s assistant professors are women; at the associate and full professor level, about 15% are women. With this program, TUE wants to reach 50% of women for assistant and associate professors, and 35% for full professors. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Men need not apply: university set to open jobs just to womenlast_img read more

Archaeological society tries to stem continuing controversy over MeToo scandal

first_img By Lizzie WadeApr. 18, 2019 , 4:45 PM Archaeological society tries to stem continuing controversy over #MeToo scandal Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email The Society for American Archaeology (SAA) continues to battle fallout for the way it handled a #MeToo scandal at its annual meeting last week. The organization faced a firestorm of criticism on social media for not immediately ejecting an alleged harasser from the meeting after being informed about his presence and a university investigation that found accusations against him credible. Today, as archaeologists continued to vent at their own society, it published an open letter and video from President Joe Watkins personally apologizing for not taking action and laying out actions SAA will take, including updating its sexual harassment policy and providing training to staff on its “effective and compassionate implementation.”“Finally, the start of a sincere response from the SAA,” tweeted Stephanie Halmhofer, a cultural resources management archaeologist with In Situ Archaeological Consulting in Roberts Creek, Canada. But it remains to be seen whether the latest apology will be enough to staunch the flow of archaeologists pledging to leave SAA. Meanwhile, other societies have announced plans to revamp their harassment policies to handle similar situations.Two days ago, SAA apologized for “the impact, stress, and fear the situation caused to victims of sexual harassment within our field,” as well as for its own delay in issuing an apology. But on 17 April, it published a controversial timeline of events that sparked another social media row. DARIA KIRPACH/@SALZMANART The trouble began when David Yesner, an archaeologist who retired from the University of Alaska in Anchorage (UAA) in 2017 showed up in Albuquerque, New Mexico, for SAA’s annual meeting, which ran from 10–14 April. Yesner had been banned from UAA’s campus and events 2 days before the meeting began, after a Title IX investigation found nine women’s accusations of sexual harassment and assault to be credible. Three claimants in the investigation were also at the SAA meeting and reported Yesner’s presence to the organization. But during the meeting, SAA did not reveal to them or others whether it had ejected Yesner.Yesner did not respond to Science’s requests for comment and has not publicly commented on the accusations.On 16 April, SAA said it would be adding an on-site counselor to future meetings and instituting board and staff training on sexual harassment, as well as a “member-led, independent committee to address member concerns,” all steps that Watkins highlighted again in today’s open letter and video. But Tuesday’s statement wasn’t enough to calm the growing outrage. “An apology without more concrete steps and/or changes is not enough,” tweeted Sara Gonzalez, an archaeologist at the University of Washington in Seattle. “Your apology should be directed at the brave women who reported … abuse and assaults.”Then, on 17 April, SAA clarified that it had in fact ejected Yesner from the meeting on the afternoon of Friday, 12 April, hours after two official complaints were filed. (One was filed by Norma Johnson, a graduate student in archaeology at UAA and a claimant in the Title IX investigation.) “At no time before Friday, April 12, 2019 did SAA receive any information regarding Mr. Yesner which would have precluded his attendance at the meeting,” SAA said in its statement.But many archaeologists say that ignores actions taken by freelance journalist (and former Science correspondent) Michael Balter, who says he notified SAA staff about Yesner’s presence and the results of the Title IX investigation on Thursday morning. Balter escorted Yesner out of the meeting that afternoon, but Yesner apparently returned. Balter reported being banned from the SAA meeting on Friday morning.Multiple lawyers and consultants specializing in sexual harassment have confirmed to Science that SAA could have removed Yesner from the meeting before official reports were filed, as the meeting was a private event.Today, Watkins attempted to repair the damage with his open letter. “I want to apologize for the events that happened last week in Albuquerque under my watch,” he wrote. “I failed to take the kind of action we should have taken to address the distress of the attendees at our meeting. I allowed myself to be convinced that our harassment policy was more important than the feelings of our members.”Early reaction was positive. “The president’s statement echoes many of the frustrations that we have felt in the past week. I was impressed” with how he took responsibility for placing policy over members’ experiences, says Kristina Killgrove, a bioarchaeologist at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, who resigned as chair of SAA’s media relations committee because of the scandal. But she would like more clarity on how the SAA board will work with organization’s staff to make sure these changes are made, as well as precisely how SAA plans to improve its communications with membership and the public. “SAA membership both at and away from this year’s conference were shocked that their voices on Twitter and Facebook were insufficient to catch the board’s attention in real time. I hope that the SAA’s plan to revamp its communication processes includes more than lip service to the power of social media,” she says.Meanwhile, other societies are taking a lesson from the firestorm. On 16 April, the American Anthropological Association (AAA) in Arlington, Virginia, offered a clear solution to situations like this, in an updated policy on sexual harassment and assault. “Individuals who are currently sanctioned for assault or harassment by an adjudicating institution (e.g., a university) will be barred from taking part in AAA events,” the policy reads. “Appeals may be requested in the case of advance registration; on-site registration for such individuals will not be permitted.”AAA Executive Director Edward Liebow told Science the organization had already been working on enacting “an enhanced policy” for its upcoming annual meeting but that the SAA incident “certainly hastened along our procedural discussion.”The American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) in Herndon, Virginia, is also considering updating its policies in response. “As events at the SAA [meeting] unfolded, we began taking notes,” says AAPA President Anne Grauer. “We will be discussing these issues in detail at a Board of Directors meeting shortly.”Others have urged the American Association of Geographers (AAG) in Washington, D.C., to revoke the membership of faculty who are found to violate Title IX guidelines or who resign because of harassment accusations, as well as ban them from future AAG events.In Yesner’s case, the Alaska Anthropological Association in Anchorage appears to have been the first to act, banning him from its meetings and events on 12 April—4 days after UAA barred him from campus and while the SAA meeting was still going on. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

NASA overcomes militarys GPS tweaks to peer inside hurricanes

first_img Email JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST VIA GETTY IMAGES Better wind data on Hurricane Michael might have shown it would hit the Florida Panhandle. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img NASA overcomes military’s GPS tweaks to peer inside hurricanes A mission to probe winds deep inside hurricanes, where most satellites cannot see and few aircraft venture, is showing signs of success despite an unexpected obstacle linked to tensions in the Middle East.A constellation of eight microsatellites has harvested data that—if folded into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) weather models—could have sharpened forecasts of several recent hurricanes, including Michael, a category-5 storm that hit Florida last year. “We’re finally getting stuff that really looks useful,” says Frank Marks, who leads hurricane researchers exploring the data at NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) in Miami, Florida. But the progress was hard-won for scientists on NASA’s $157 million Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS), who discussed early results at a meeting last week, just as another Atlantic hurricane season kicked off.With its flotilla of satellites crisscrossing the tropical oceans, CYGNSS can see through the thick clouds of cyclones. The satellites collect radio signals beamed from standard GPS beacons after they bounce off the ocean’s surface. The reflections are influenced by sea’s roughness, which depends on wind speed. But a month after launch in December 2016, the team noticed the GPS signals were wavering. “We assumed they are constant,” says Christopher Ruf, CYGNSS’s principal investigator and an atmospheric scientist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. “And they’re not.” By Paul VoosenJun. 12, 2019 , 1:00 PM The U.S. military runs the GPS system, and in January 2017, it began to boost the radio power on 10 of its GPS satellites as they passed over a broad region centered on northern Syria. The power boosts, which can thwart jamming, have recurred without warning, each lasting several hours. “It’s an opaque situation, obviously, because it’s a classified military situation,” Ruf says. The swings don’t interfere with other scientific uses of GPS. But they threw off the constellation’s measurements of high winds by 5 meters a second or more—the difference between a category-2 and category-3 hurricane.After 2 years of work, the CYGNSS team has compensated by reprogramming its satellites on the fly. The satellites carry large antennas to catch reflected GPS signals, but they also have small antennas that receive direct GPS signals, for tracking time and location. The team repurposed the small antennas to measure the signal strength of the GPS satellites, making it possible to correct the wind speed measures. “It works,” Ruf says. “We’ve been testing it for a number of months.”Even before that fix, the wind data were good enough to improve some hurricane forecasts, says Bachir Annane, an atmospheric scientist at AOML. In the case of Michael, NOAA’s forecast models failed, Annane says: They predicted it would track too far west, close to Alabama rather than Florida, and underestimated its ferocious winds. When he reran the models with CYGNSS winds, Annane found that the storm’s forecasted early track and its intensity stayed closer to reality. The wind data would have improved track forecasts for two other recent hurricanes, Harvey and Irma, as well, he says.The satellites are also giving scientists a view of the winds underlying the Madden-Julian oscillation, a large cluster of storms that periodically forms in the Indian Ocean and marches around the equator, influencing global weather. “Seeing under the rain was a big draw for us,” says Eric Maloney, an atmospheric scientist at Colorado State University (CSU) in Fort Collins, because scientists have long debated what fuels the storms. Last week at the CYGNSS meeting, Bohar Singh, an atmospheric scientist who works with Maloney at CSU, described evidence from CYGNSS that persistent winds boost ocean evaporation under a 3000-kilometer-wide set of rainstorms, sustaining them. That finding could help scientists forecast how the storm belt will change in a warmer climate, Maloney says.After a few tweaks, CYGNSS can now look at land, too. Its antennas are capturing signs of soil moisture, says Clara Chew, a remote sensing hydrologist at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. Although not as capable as a single dedicated satellite, CYGNSS’s multiple satellites make more frequent measurements, which could help it monitor flood risks and track how different soils retain rain. “You can start to quantify how long the soil remembers,” Chew says.NOAA scientists hope the new GPS fix will unleash the microsatellites’ full potential for looking into storms, perhaps revealing new insights into why some hurricanes suddenly intensify. NOAA isn’t likely to start using the CYGNSS data in its routine forecasts, Marks says. The satellites don’t belong to the weather agency, and they are unlikely to last more than 7 years before failing. But he thinks their success against the odds could help persuade NOAA to launch its own wind-monitoring constellation.last_img read more

County officials consider litigation related to opioid crisis

first_imgCounty officials consider litigation related to opioid crisis May 28, 2018 By Toni Gibbons “The opioid crisis is a major problem in this country and the stats surrounding it are staggering,” said Anthony Coury, an attorney with the Napier Law Firm in Phoenix at the NavajoSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

European Union Election results 10 key developments you need to know

first_img7. Although Labour and the Conservatives, each of whom wanted to seek a compromise Brexit in different ways, were hammered, the election has left Britain’s EU exit more uncertain, with both Brexiteers and pro-EU “remainers” able to claim strong support.8. However, Farage, founder of the Brexit Party, said Britain should get set to leave the European Union without a divorce deal after the election saw his eurosceptic party and pro-EU forces carve up the UK’s votes at the expense of the long-dominant larger parties.9. Between May 23 and May 26, citizens from 28 member countries of European had the opportunity to vote for who will represent them in the European Parliament over the next five years.10. The biggest challenge for these elections is communicating to voters what the parliament and its members actually do, Simon Usherwood, deputy director of the research initiative, UK in a Changing Europe told CNN.(With inputs from Agencies) Related News UK economy probably shrank for first time in seven years UK’s Boris Johnson declines to comment on plan to facilitate a no-deal Brexit 3. Although having a somewhat similar stand regarding the Brexit, UK’s governing Conservative Party was wiped out, as pro-Brexit and pro-EU voters both punished it for leading the country into a political impasse and failing to lead it out of the EU.4 Contenders for the leadership of Conservatives, the ruling party in Britain, said the results were a demand to deliver Brexit no matter what. Theresa May, who is stepping down as Conservative leader in June, said the night in which the results were out had been “very disappointing”.5. Since the result bolsters those who want Britain to leave the EU with no agreement on departure terms and future relations, economists say that would cause economic turmoil and plunge Britain into recession.6. The opposition Labour Party said a public vote — a new national election or a second referendum — was the way to reunite the country. It pledged to make sure a new Conservative leader would not take Britain out of the EU without a transition deal to help protect the economy. Aegean lessons EUROPEAN UNION ELECTIONS, EU elections, eu election results, eu elections brexit, brexit deal, eu election brexit deal, eu election deal, brexit party, labour party, conservative party, theresa may, liberal party, indian express Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party got the highest number of votes, thus capturing the maximum number of seats in the Parliament of European Parliament.The results of the European Union elections, which drew importance owing to speculations over Brexit deal, saw Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party getting the highest number of votes, thus capturing the maximum number of seats in the Parliament of European Parliament. This was followed by a group of pro-EU parties which kept a strong grip on the EU Parliament maintaining a balance against the surge in polling in favour of the eurosceptic party. Best Of Express Here are the ten things you need to know about European Union elections1. This was the first time that a eurosceptic party like the Brexit Party won control of a quarter (29 out of 73) of seats in European elections by winning 31.71% of the votes. The pro-EU Liberal Democrats occupied the second position with 20% of the votes and 16 seats, up from only one at the last EU election in 201, while Labour came third with 10 seats, followed by the pro-European, environmentalist Greens with seven.2. Green parties in Germany, France, Britain and elsewhere celebrated big gains in the elections for the 751-seat parliament amid growing voter concerns over climate change, expressed in large-scale student protests over recent months. The rise of the Greens, with their distinctly pro-European Union stance, marks a counterpoint to that of the far-right, anti-migrant parties that have been growing in popularity across Europe in recent years.center_img Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Advertising Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off Advertising P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Published: May 27, 2019 7:46:45 pm Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Health ranking Tamil Nadu objects NITI says any relook only next year

first_img Best Of Express Tamil Nadu, considered one of the best states in the country in quality and affordable healthcare, had been placed ninth in the ranking, slipping six places since the 2015-16 report. A top consultant with the National Health Mission said Tamil Nadu could end up losing funds as a result, with allocation of 40 per cent of incentives to states based on this ranking.The states were judged on parameters such as institutional deliveries and immunisation coverage, and functional 24X7 Public Health Centres. Kerala, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra and Gujarat were among the top-ranking states.Tamil Nadu has alleged discrepancies in NITI Aayog’s assessment and called it based on wrong methodology and indicators. It has also said that a senior state officer had reported these errors to NITI Aayog CEO Amitabh Kant during consultation and preparation of the draft report. While Kant was not available for comment, Alok Kumar, Advisor (Health), NITI Aayog said they had to frame a standard base for the states given the diversity of the country.He added that CEO Kant had held a video conference with principal secretaries of all states and examined their recommendations following a first-round report last year. “Some of their (views) were accepted and some were not… For the second report’s preparation, every state was given details of the parameters used for ranking them,” he said, adding, “Once you agree on certain rules of the game, you cannot change them midway. In a country like India, it is impossible to satisfy every state on every issue… Where do we end up if… each and every state starts to disagree with denominators and insists on its own?”About Tamil Nadu’s demand for “corrections”, Kumar said a committee under the Health Ministry would consider and accept all the “genuine demands” in next year’s report. Written by Arun Janardhanan | Chennai | Updated: July 8, 2019 7:19:44 am Advertising Related News LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? Advertising Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Budget boost for Electric Vehicles will give India a first mover advantage: NITI Aayog’s Rajiv Kumar More Explained Taking stock of monsoon rain center_img ExplainedWhy rank countsThe NITI Aayog health index has been evolved to also steer government investments towards states more efficient and innovative in meeting targets. But the incremental ranking has come as a negative for traditionally “better” states as it is usually more difficult to traverse the last mile on health indices.Following the release of the report, both Tamil Nadu Chief Secretary Girija Vaidyanathan and Health Minister C Vijayabaskar had written to NITI Aayog laying down the state’s stand. Vijayabaskar had also held a press meeting accusing the panel of ignoring the state’s “outstanding” performance in public health. * Why was average expenditure on health in the state, public health delivery system, and status of the state in crucial sectors such as non-communicable diseases and trauma care not assessed?* Officers say real-time data captured by Tamil Nadu through its Pregnancy and Infant Cohort Monitoring and Evaluation System shows 9.4 lakh live births. They add that using actual live birth data, and correlating the same with the state’s Mother and Child Tracking System and Civil Registration System, would have put institutional delivery at 99.8% against 80.5% as in the report. That sinking feeling: Water table dip and how Punjab must fight the looming crisis After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan * In a letter to Union Health Minister Harsh Vardhan, state Health Minister Vijayabaskar said NITI Aayog had failed to consider the state’s unique public health cadre system. Unlike other states that have only a Chief Medical Officer in districts, the state has an officer in each district who is a public health expert with a medical degree, who monitors all national programmes and public health challenges locally. The state also cites its “unique” secondary healthcare network, including a separate directorate and one secondary care hospital in every taluk, with a network of 278 such hospitals. health index, health index second round, health index niti aayog, health index Tamil Nadu, top healthcare facilities in india A top consultant with the National Health Mission said Tamil Nadu could end up losing funds as a result, with allocation of 40 per cent of incentives to states based on this ranking. (File)NITI Aayog has said that it can consider Tamil Nadu’s objections to its poor ranking on the ‘Healthy States Progressive India Report (2017-18)’, released on June 26, only next year. A senior state health officer told The Indian Express, “We raised (objections) during the consultation stage itself. And those representations to make NITI Aayog understand about our public health network and services were at the highest level, in a letter sent by the Chief Secretary to the CEO of NITI Aayog. Unfortunately, they ignored us and released a report with discrepancies and approximate figures instead of accurate data, and based on wrong methodologies.”Senior state officers and health experts listed following examples of alleged discrepancies, “wrong methodology” and “inaccurate data” in the report:* Why was Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR), “one of the most important health indicators”, not taken into consideration? As per the state’s Sample Registration System, its MMR is 16, while Andhra Pradesh, that came second in the health ranking, has an MMR of 32 and Gujarat, fourth in the report, an MMR of 30. Tamil Nadu has also cited its low Infant Mortality Rate (IMR), 2, compared to Kerala’s 1, and Andhra Pradesh and Gujarat’s 13 and 11 respectively, and said the report ignored the state’s live data in this regard.NITI Aayog advisor Kumar said MMR data was not considered as theirs was an annual report while MMR data was for three years. UP Cabinet discusses NITI suggestions, merger of ministries, govt departments on the anvil Advertising 1 Comment(s)last_img read more

Kolkata More councillors return from BJP TMC regains 2 civic bodies

first_img Advertising Related News Best Of Express West Bengal Assembly: Two resolutions on ‘rising communalism’ passed by House after a united discussion Kolkata: Kanchrapara municipality 5 councillors return to TMC kolkata, kolkata mlas, kolkata mlas bjp, kolkata mlas return tmc, kolkata politics, abhishek banerjee, abhishek banerjee on tmc, indian express news Addressing the media, Banerjee said, “After he caused defections, the media described Mukul Roy as the Chanakya of Bengal politics. Now a large number of them have returned to us. (Express photo/Representational)On a day several TMC councillors returned to the party a month after joining the BJP, helping the ruling party in West Bengal to regain Kanchrapara and Halisahar municipalities in North 24 Parganas district and South Dinajpur Zilla Parishad, senior BJP leader Mukul Roy on Saturday claimed that more than 100 MLAs, most of them from TMC, are in touch with the saffron party “Nearly 107 MLAs are in touch with us. Majority of them are from the TMC — a few are from the Congress and CPI(M),” Roy said, without providing details. Advertising The TMC also regained majority in South Dinajpur Zilla Parishad after three out of 11 TMC members who had defected to the BJP earlier this month returned to the Trinamool. Out of 18 Zilla Parishad seats, the TMC now has support of 11 members, party leaders pointed out.Local BJP leader Suvendu Sarkar said, “Trinamool leaders are using police and administration to force them to return to their party. This will not work forever. More such leaders will join the BJP in the coming days.” By Express News Service |Kolkata | Updated: July 14, 2019 2:01:32 amcenter_img After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan 4 Comment(s) Section 144 in Bengal town after TMC, BJP workers clash Many TMC leaders joined the BJP in the run-up to, and especially after the Lok Sabha polls results. In most cases, the defections were engineered by Roy.Banerjee also maintained that TMC has gained the majority in Halisahar municipality after one more councillor returned to the party. “Out of total 23 councillors in Halisahar, many of our councillors had gone to the BJP. On July 9, 12 councillors returned to TMC and today one more rejoined us. So we have support of 13 councillors out of 23,” he said.Reacting to the development, Roy claimed this “return” to the TMC is a part of his party’s strategy. “This is nothing but a political strategy. Just wait and watch. They might be in TMC, but they will work for BJP…,” he asserted.On July 10, the TMC retained Haringhata municipality in Nadia by registering support of nine councillors in the 17-ward civic body during a no-confidence motion brought by BJP. The no-confidence motion was brought after several TMC councillors pledged their support to the BJP. Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence TMC leader and party Lok Sabha MP Abhishek Banerjee dismissed Roy’s claims.Addressing the media, Banerjee said, “After he caused defections, the media described Mukul Roy as the Chanakya of Bengal politics. Now a large number of them have returned to us. This so-called Chanakya should be described as a Chanakya who is made in China. A leader who cannot hold on to TMC councillors in his party is claiming that more than 107 TMC MLAs are in touch with him…”Banerjee said, “Out of 24 councillors at Kanchrapara, we had 22 councillors, of whom 17 had joined the BJP on May 28. Five councillors had returned earlier, and today nine more have returned. We already had five councillors. After this, we have 19 out of 24 councillors in Kanchrapara — we clearly have the majority and will form the board.” Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield last_img read more

Jaguar IPace vs Tesla Model 3 Which Is the Better Electric Car

first_imgThe primary reason that I prefer the I-Pace is that I don’t drive sedans. I drive sports cars and small SUVs. Right now, Tesla doesn’t build a car that is in my preferred class. If there were an I-Pace with the high-end Model 3’s performance, or a Model 3 SUV, I would be on the shortlist to buy it.I live in Bend, Oregon and most everything I do is within 30 miles of the house. I have five cars, so if I need to go a longer distance, I’ll pick something else. The I-Pace has been brilliant in the snow and ice (I have Bridgestone Blizzard tires on it), and it is rare enough that people do compliment the car and wave when they see it (those exchanges are always fun when you have a relatively unusual ride).The I-Pace is one of the most comfortable cars, both in the front and back seats, that I’ve ever owned. I own three Jaguars and used to be a Jaguar mechanic in my youth — but honestly, given my experience, if Tesla were to build a small attractive SUV, I’d likely switch. To keep me on board, Jaguar would have to improve its customer communications, and better protect the car from future technical advances, particularly with charging.Jaguar simply hasn’t been enlisting advocates as well as Tesla does, and this is something only Porsche seems to fully get. That may explain why Porsche’s coming electric Tesla Model 3 To suggest that electric cars are having a painful birth would be a colossal understatement. Tesla clearly plowed this field and quickly recognized that the lack of a charging infrastructure was going to be a problem and, with reasonable effectiveness, dealt with it tactically. However, those “tactical” chickens are about to come home to roost and it probably won’t be pretty.Jaguar, the first company to offer a true alternative to the Tesla, did some things very right and some very, very wrong. Rather than developing a Tesla killer, it instead created an impressive SUV that could have been far better.I bought the Jaguar I-Pace, one of a tiny handful in customers’ hands right now, and I think the perfect electric car would be a blend of the Model 3 and the I-Pace (pictured above). I’ll explain why and then close with my product of the week: a high-tech hearing aid I saw at CES that might give you one of Superman’s powers. This is clearly subjective, but of the shipping electrics (and most that aren’t shipping, the Porsche being the obvious exception), I think the I-Pace is the best-looking car. It does conform to the European/U.S. standard for charging plugs (both normal and high speed), and it is a member of the far more popular SUV class.Fit and finish are first rate, though lower-cost versions have been accused of having too much plastic (something that also plagued the Model 3). As with the Tesla, there appears to have been a strong focus on handling and safety.With clear Range Rover influence, the I-Pace also appears to have decent off-road capability, although taking an electric off-road for any distance is problematic, due to a lack of chargers and an inability to carry anything like spare fuel.The Tesla charger network supports mostly Teslas. (You can get an adapter to use non-Supercharger Tesla stations, but these take hours to charge the car and are impractical outside of emergency use).While there are networks of chargers being installed, we are far from critical mass with high-speed chargers, which aren’t stable at the moment. Yes, the plug is set, but the latest chargers are 450KW monsters, or nearly 4x as powerful as existing Superchargers. Right now, there are no cars that can use this power (including the I-Pace). Worse, there is no communication from Jaguar to indicate if there is a path to upgrade the car at some later date.While expected range was supposed to be in the mid to high 200-mile range, the I-Pace has fallen short, even though it has a huge battery. This may be because Jaguar is ensuring the battery will last for the life of the car, or it could be the result of using a front motor that doesn’t freewheel when not in use. There is no clarity on the cause, however, and Jaguar so far has not communicated a fix.One big difference is that patching on a Tesla is like Christmas, because you often get cool new surprise features. One of my last patches on the Jaguar rendered the center display inoperative, and it took nearly three weeks to get the car so it could be driven again. Over-the-air patching is now a well-known process with the tech community, and there is no reason this should have happened it proper testing practices had been used.One weird difference between the Model 3 and the I-Pace is that the Model 3 isn’t positioned as a performance car, yet it not only has a track mode (good luck fast-charging it at the track), but also has a performance version that would embarrass most muscle cars.The I-Pace is positioned as a performance car and it doesn’t seem to have the same level of performance that the Model 3 does in its performance configuration. This is the same issue I had with the Tesla Model S vs. the Fisker Karma.The Tesla looked like a regular sedan but was incredibly fast, while the Fisker looked like a supercar but performed in line with a relatively slow sedan. It felt like the cars’ guts were (or should have been) swapped at birth. The car that didn’t look fast was, and the car that did wasn’t. Granted, the I-Pace would dust a Fisker, but that really isn’t saying much. While Tesla isn’t known for being the smartest car maker, having made a ton of manufacturing mistakes over the years, it is by far the most experienced company with electric cars. Its brilliant decisions include coming in at the top rather than the bottom of the market, as Fiat did. Fiat loses a ton of money on every electric car it sells. While Tesla did lose money, its losses were tied to explosive growth and not the profitability of the Model S.Tesla built a charging infrastructure reasonably, though far from completely, dealing with one of the two electric car problems. It has the closest thing to gas station equivalence for chargers right now, particularly when it comes to high-speed chargers, which Tesla calls “Superchargers.” Finally, it focused on making the cars really safe, and actually broke some of Consumer Reports testing equipment because its cars were so robust.However, Tesla made some really nasty mistakes as well. It didn’t use experienced manufacturing teams, either to build the plant or manage it, resulting in avoidable losses and huge delays.The most popular vehicles in the U.S. were SUVs and pickups. Tesla was slow to develop SUVs, and the one it brought to market, the Model X, was a reliability and complexity nightmare (it also was pretty unattractive).Ironically, pickup trucks likely would be ideal electric cars, because people generally don’t drive them long distances. As a work vehicle, the battery could have done double duty as a power source for tools. It is therefore interesting to note that the first electric pickup won’t come from Tesla or Ford, but from another new company that Tesla or Ford likely should just buy.The problem with the Tesla charging stations is that they don’t comply with the Asian or European/U.S. standards for plugs or core technology.Given the required electronic integration with direct high-speed chargers and the car, there is some doubt whether adapters for the European/U.S. fast-charging stations will work at full power, if at all, with a Tesla.More importantly, unlike gas stations, which can be incredibly profitable, Tesla’s charging stations are largely cost centers that mostly just work with Teslas. Gas stations that could fuel only Fords wouldn’t make a ton of economic sense for the long term. Public chargers that work only with Teslas won’t be economically effective in the long term either.The Model 3 likely should have been a small SUV rather than a sedan, to get access to a larger potential market. Quality appears to be relatively poor for that car, with owners reporting missing parts, lots of paint damage, surprise shutdowns, and incomplete assembly issues. Tesla’s Brilliance and Nasty Mistakes My hearing is good for my age, though increasingly I have noticed that I’ve been missing things on TV that I should have heard. The Livio Smart Hearing Aid got my attention because it not only boosts your hearing (kind of like super hearing for those who don’t have a hearing disability), but also performs functions like a good smartwatch. Wrapping Up: I Still Prefer the I-Pacecenter_img Such complaints weren’t that uncommon in years past, but with current quality control technology they are very uncommon today with U.S., Asian, or German cars (though they do happen).Even with all of these qualifications, Tesla is largely viewed as the gold standard for electric cars. By a significant margin, it is the company to beat. has been sold out, mostly to old Tesla owners. (It also is the first car that will be able to use the new 450 KW chargers, and on paper it is faster than a Tesla.)Would I buy the car again? In a minute. I really am having a ball with the car. Still, car companies like Jaguar need to understand the disruptive nature of Tesla’s customer approach. Otherwise, Tesla will continue to outmaneuver them, and it must be embarrassing to be upstaged constantly by a firm that is so new in what has been a well-established market.By the way, I keep getting notices from Jaguar wanting me to write a review of the I-Pace, but each review I’ve written has been kicked back for things like mentioning Tesla or the problems I’ve had with the car. You don’t learn by forcing reviewers to talk exclusively about the positive. Oh, and the review submission form goes only to 2018 and this is a 2019 car… . For instance, it will send out an alert if you fall. It integrates a digital voice assistant into the solution so you can get directions, ask questions, and get the help you need when you need it.The full list of features includes body and brain tracking, heart rate monitoring, fall detection and alerts, a virtual assistant, a voice-to-text tool, and real-time translation capability. It is a behind-the-ear design, so it isn’t tiny but, unless you are looking for it, it is reasonably well concealed.This would be very useful for transcribing meetings, capturing threats from misbehaving coworkers that later might be denied (and it is a hearing aid), and getting help to you if you should get into trouble.This could be a critical feature for something that is still emerging, a personal safety and security service. Imagine — a child being kidnapped could just say a trigger word, and that alone could alert parents and police both to the nature of the problem and the location, while the direction from the dispatcher would be heard only by the child.You could get verbal alerts if you were jogging into danger, get alerts of impending catastrophic weather events without needing to see your phone, and get far more accurate heart rate measurements.Because this hearing aid could make both those we care about and us far safer, the Livio AI Hearing Aid from Starkey Technologies is my product of the week. (It even does a decent job if you want to listen to music on your phone.)The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ECT News Network. Livio Smart Hearing Aid The Jaguar I-Pace: A Pretty Face Hides Some Ugly Mistakes Rob Enderle has been an ECT News Network columnist since 2003. His areas of interest include AI, autonomous driving, drones, personal technology, emerging technology, regulation, litigation, M&E, and technology in politics. He has an MBA in human resources, marketing and computer science. He is also a certified management accountant. Enderle currently is president and principal analyst of the Enderle Group, a consultancy that serves the technology industry. He formerly served as a senior research fellow at Giga Information Group and Forrester. Email Rob.last_img read more

Apple Presents Its Spin on Entertainment and News

first_imgOprah Winfrey appeared at the Apple announcement event and revealed that she has been working on two documentaries for TV+ — one about the toll of sexual harassment, assault and violation in the workplace, with the working title, “Toxic Labor,” and another that will be a multipart series about mental health.She also said she intends to build “the biggest, the most vibrant, the most stimulating book club on the planet” on the platform. All the News Fit to Curate An Apple First Apple also announced a new News+ app, which will contain more than 300 magazines, along with electronic subscriptions to The Wall Street Journal and the Los Angeles Times.Subscriptions to News+ will be US$9.99 a month, with the first month of the service offered free.”Apple News+ could be fairly interesting,” said Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT, a technology advisory firm in Hayward, California.”It streamlines access to print content, and could provide revenue streams to publications that haven’t been able to effectively sell access to their own content,” he told TechNewsWorld.Conspicuous by their absence from Apple News+ were The Washington Post and The New York Times.Financials may have played an important role in the newspapers staying away from News+, said John Carroll, a media analyst for WBUR in Boston.”Apple is taking 50 percent of News+ subscription revenues and dividing the rest of it among the publishers,” he told TechNewsWorld. “That’s a less lucrative deal for publishers than selling subscriptions through the App Store where Apple only gets a 30 percent cut.” “This is a big, big step for Apple,” said Maria Rua Aguete, executive director for media, service providers and platforms at IHS Markit, a research, analysis, and advisory firm headquartered in London.”It means they’re opening a world that they weren’t willing to open before,” she told TechNewsWorld.”It’s going to give them access to 9 million homes in the U.S. that have smart TVs,” Aguete added. “Content is important, but distribution is important as well, so it is important for them to be available in as many devices as possible.” More Than Chasing Eyeballs Along with Apple TV+, the company announced Apple TV Channels, an aggregation service for offerings from cable and satellite networks, as well as HBO, Hulu and others.”Acting as an aggregator may be a way for Apple to hedge against its original content not doing well,” said Ross Rubin, principal analyst at Reticle Research, a consumer technology advisory firm in New York City. Apple on Monday announced a raft of new services, including original TV programming and news and magazine offerings, at an event held at the Steve Jobs Theater in Cupertino, California.The Apple TV+ service, which will launch in the fall, already has a number of high-profile shows in its lineup:Amazing Stories, a science fiction anthology produced by Steven Spielberg;Morning Show, a series about a fictional TV morning show, with Reese Witherspoon, Jennifer Aniston and Steve Carell;See, set in a post-apocalypse world where everyone is blind following a holocaust, starring Aquaman’s Jason Momoa;Little America, an anthology about new American immigrants, produced by Kumail Nanjiani;Little Voice, a series about a musician played by Sara Bereilles, who is a songwriter, author and actress in real life, produced by J.J. Abrams; andHelpsters, a children’s show that combines muppets and computer coding. Conspicuous Absences Pricing for the new services was not announced.In a departure from its business model, Apple is offering Channels and TV+ content on devices not made by the company.”We know you’re going to want this great experience on every screen in your home, so we’re doing something we’ve never done before,” Peter Stern, Apple vice president for cloud services, told the audience on Monday. “We’re bringing the Apple TV app to smart TVs.”The app will be included on smart TVs made by Samsung, LG, Sony and Vizio, he said. In addition, it will be available on Roku and Amazon. Apple also announced a new credit card and a subscription game offering at its event on Monday.The Apple Card lives in the iPhone, although you can get a physical card if you want one. The card, backed by MasterCard and Goldman Sachs, offers low interest rates, no late fees and daily cash-back rewards.The card is an admission by Apple that adoption of its Pay product isn’t growing as fast or as widely as hoped, observed Pund-IT’s King.”Tim Cook emphasized the point that Pay transactions have passed 10 billion annually. “While that seems like a big number, it’s a tiny fraction of the total number of credit and debit card transactions conducted every year,” he noted.”If Apple can significantly alter the credit-debit card landscape, it would have a huge impact on both the company and the industry,” King added, “but so far, Apple’s attempts to insert itself into credit-debit payments has been less impressive than its claims.”Apple Arcade is a gaming subscription service that the company will launch in the fall in 150 countries. It will have more than 100 exclusive games, all of which can be downloaded and played offline.”Arcade gives developers a chance to monetize games that have been slow to gain an audience,” Reticle’s Rubin told TechNewsWorld.It also gives Apple a chance to strengthen its position in mobile games, where it is already a stong player, he added.”Apple Arcade leverages one of the company’s most successful services — the App Store — and includes some intriguing exclusive new content that is likely to attract gamers of every sort,” King noted. “That said, it seems to be a less ambitious effort than the new Stadia platform and service that Google announced last week.” Data collection is another hangup newspapers have with services like News+.”When you turn your content over to this other platform, it gets most of the benefits that can be data mined for readers,” Carroll explained. “That loss of control by the Times and the Post would also be a deterrent to joining News+, especially since the newspapers are already doing well selling digital subscriptions on their own.”Curation of new stories also could become an issue for publishers. For example, Apple has said it will emphasize general news content from The Wall Street Journal and place financial news in a secondary tier. So the Journal has announced it will be hiring more reporters to cover general news.”That brings up the issue of, will Apple news start dictating what types of content it will showcase and influence the editorial judgment of some publications?” Carroll pointed out.”That could be very troubling to any number of news organizations,” he said. Apple TV+ is not just about seeking a new growth market.”It is about a technical shift to connected smart services of the future that offer everything online,” said Mark Skilton, a professor at the Warwick Business School in the UK.”But is Apple really going to beat Netflix?” he asked.”Even if they roll out the red carpet for movie stars, it will be a challenge for Apple to provide a compelling new TV experience,” Skilton said.”This is a risky move for Tim Cook. I remain unconvinced he is the right leader for the next generation,” he added.”The company’s track record lately with the Apple Watch and home speaker does not bode well for a new TV launch that is really just more of the same,” added Skilton. “It is not reinventing the TV and content market the way the iPhone did for mobile communication.”First-party content is a great risk for Apple, suggested Patrick Moorhead, principal analyst at Moor Insights and Strategy, a technology analyst and advisory firm in Austin, Texas.”It’s one thing to redistribute content, but it’s an entirely different proposition altogether to create content,” he told TechNewsWorld.”With Apple’s No. 1 consumer brand position, all Apple can do is go down if consumers dislike or are offended by its first-party content.” Moorhead said. All You Can Eat Gaming John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John.last_img read more

Sexual harassment rates are above national average in California reports study

first_imgCalifornia has led the nation’s focus on the #MeToo and #TimesUp movement. This report offers a stark look at the widespread prevalence of verbal, physical and cyber-based sexual harassment in the Golden State.”Anita Raj, PhD, professor in the Department of Medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine and director of GEH More than 86 percent of women in California (compared with 81 percent nationally) and 53 percent of men (compared with 43 percent nationally) report having experienced some form of sexual harassment and/or assault in their lifetime. Three out of four foreign-born men reported harassment compared to one out of two U.S.-born men living in the state. Four out of five lesbian and bisexual women have faced sexual assault compared with one in four straight women. Three out of four gay and bisexual men have faced aggressive sexual harassment (e.g., stalking, unwanted sexual touching) compared with one out of three straight men. Related StoriesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaSmarter, more educated people get a cognitive ‘head start’, but aren’t protected from Alzheimer’sIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyGEH is an academic center focused on public health and social science research and methods to build evidence on gender inequities and health, and how to tackle inequities for better health outcomes.Raj and co-authors said “Measuring #MeToo in California, 2019: A Statewide Assessment of Sexual Harassment and Assault” marks the first statewide analysis on the prevalence and scope of sexual harassment and assault in California. They will release their report Thursday, May 23. The team has, for the past two years, also released a nationwide study exploring the same data points across the entire United States.The California-focused study found that overall Californians who identify as gay or lesbian, as well as male Californians who were born outside of the United States, are at higher risk of experiencing sexual harassment and assault.Specific findings: Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 24 2019In the state of California, reported incidences of sexual harassment are 5 percent higher for women and 10 percent higher for men than the national average, report the authors of a joint study produced by the Center for Gender Equity and Health (GEH) at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and the nonprofit organization California Coalition Against Sexual Assault (CALCASA).center_img “This report demonstrates that sexual harassment is prevalent and ubiquitous, but at the same time, we also see higher rates on some of our most marginalized residents, such as gay, lesbian and bisexual people and foreign-born men,” said Raj.David S. Lee, director of prevention, CALCASA, said that the study offers yet another confirmation of the desperate need for education about sexual consent.”Prevention efforts, including education in schools as early as possible, around issues of consent and harassment are crucial,” said Lee. “We know that prevention works, and it’s necessary to shift to a culture where individuals look out for one another.” Source:University of California San Diegolast_img read more

IVI and MCRI to coordinate global push for developing vaccine against Strep

first_imgThe World Health Organization prioritized a vaccine for Strep A in 2014, and in 2018 unanimously passed a resolution calling for action against rheumatic heart disease, including a vaccine against Strep A.MCRI’s Head of Infection and Immunity, Prof Andrew Steer, said there were concerns in the scientific community about the effectiveness of antibiotics to treat Strep A in the future as groups of Strep A had evolved to be resistant to the antibiotics azithromycin and clarithromycin.Related StoriesNew shingles vaccine reduces outbreaks of painful rash among stem cell transplant patientsNovel vaccine against bee sting allergy successfully testedScripps CHAVD wins $129 million NIH grant to advance new HIV vaccine approach”Already invasive Strep A infections like the notorious ‘flesh-eating bacteria’ and ‘toxic shock’ kill 150,000 people around the globe each year,” said Prof Steer, who is also an honorary fellow with the University of Melbourne.”But there is little awareness of Strep A among the public, policymakers, and even scientists – and so there has been little incentive for major vaccine manufacturers to get behind vaccine development.””IVI and MCRI have set up an international consortium to pool wisdom and resources to embark on an overdue process to develop one of the vaccines the world most urgently needs and most terribly underfunds.”Work to raise awareness and build global support for the development of a Strep A vaccine is supported by the new Wellcome grant. “We will create the means to advocate internationally for increased vaccine research and develop the cases for investment in Strep A vaccines at business and policy levels,” Dr Kim said. “By the end of the project, we also hope to have identified a major vaccine manufacturer.”Head of Vaccines at the Wellcome Trust, Dr Charlie Weller, said that vaccines are hugely powerful in preventing the spread of infectious disease globally.”Strep A bacteria causes many serious infections, including scarlet fever and rheumatic heart disease,” Dr Weller said.”It is among the top 10 causes of death worldwide, and concerns are growing about the effectiveness of the antibiotics we have to treat patients. With a Strep A vaccine huge numbers of lives could be protected, but this cannot happen without international collaboration and support.”We hope to accelerate development of the investment case for a Strep A vaccine and better understanding of the impact it would have on global public health.”Source: University of Melbourne Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 31 2019The International Vaccine Institute (IVI) and Australia’s Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) will coordinate a global push to free the world of Group A Streptococcus (Strep A), the contagious bacteria that kills half a million people every year and is developing resistance to antibiotics.The British biomedical research foundation, the Wellcome Trust, has granted $2.25 million to IVI and MCRI to coordinate world efforts to develop a vaccine against Strep A and find manufacturers.Director General of IVI, Dr Jerome Kim, said that Strep A, a bacterial pathogen, is one of the most deadly infectious diseases – ranking with tuberculosis (TB), HIV, and malaria but globally very little had been invested in Strep A research. Strep A is one of the main causes of death from infectious diseases, claiming 500,000 lives per year; however few people are aware of it.Strep A usually begins with a sore throat, but if left untreated it causes the immune system to become overactive, resulting in rheumatic heart disease, which damages heart valves and over time causes heart failure and death. This affects more than 33 million people around the world, and the vast majority of deaths are in low-and-middle-income countries. A vaccine would be the most effective and cost-effective way to control infection.”Dr Jerome Kim, Director General of IVIlast_img read more

Neuroscientists find anatomical link between cognitive and perceptual symptoms in autism

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 20 2019Neuroscientists at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) and University College London have found an anatomical link between cognitive and perceptual symptoms in autism. Published in the Journal of Neuroscience, the study identified a posterior region of the brain whose size–amount of gray matter–is related to both cognitive rigidity and overly stable visual perception, two symptoms of autism that until now were only conceptually related.Mental inflexibility is a hallmark symptom of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This is best seen in restricted and repetitive behaviors, which are required for an ASD diagnosis. These behaviors can range from stereotyped and repetitive movements to repetitive thoughts. Perception in people with ASD can also be less flexible than in others. This can be understood by considering a line drawing of a transparent cube (called a Necker cube, see Figure). When looking at this drawing, the 3-D structure of the cube seems to spontaneously invert; the front becomes the back and then becomes the front again. This type of perceptual switching is called “bistable” perception. In the case of autism however, perception is often overly stable, and does not switch back and forth as often as it does in others.The team of researchers sought to find a physical neuroanatomical link between these two characteristics of autism. They recruited people with and without ASD to perform two simple computer-based tests and an MRI scan. The first computer test assessed perceptual stability. Participants viewed a bistable image in which the front and back of a cylindrical shape switch back and forth. The second test evaluated cognitive rigidity, and was designed specifically for this study. Participants were shown shapes on a display and asked to choose a rule to follow: select the brightest shape or a specific shape. The researchers counted the numbers of times each participant reported a switch in perception during the first test and the number of times they spontaneously switched rules in the second test. These measures allowed the researchers to quantify perceptual stability and cognitive rigidity for each participant.Related StoriesNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryRush University Medical Center offers new FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysmsDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustAs expected, they found that perception of the bistable image switched much less frequently in people with ASD than in the control participants. They also found that people with ASD repeated the same rule choice–brightness or shape–for longer periods of time before switching rules. A control switching test in which participants were told to switch rules did not differ between groups, meaning that switching rules was not difficult for those with ASD, but that when acting freely, they chose to switch less often than the other participants.The results from the rule-switching task were particularly encouraging.First Author, Takamitsu Watanabe from RIKEN CBS: Cognitive rigidity in high-functioning autism is known to be difficult to detect and quantify in conventional psychological paradigms. Here, we overcame this issue with a new spontaneous task-switching test.” With these results, the team was confident that their tests were good measures of perceptual stability and cognitive rigidity.The team then took these individual scores and tested whether they correlated with the brain anatomy seen on the MRI scans. They found that one part of the brain in particular was related to both perceptual stability and cognitive rigidity. Lower density of neurons in the posterior superior parietal lobule was associated with both less frequent perceptual switching and less frequent rule switching, and was also associated with the severity of the participant’s restricted and repetitive behaviors.”We think that the posterior superior parietal lobule is the neural basis for both overly stable perception and cognitive inflexibility, two seemingly different symptoms in autism,” says Watanabe. “Knowing the importance of this brain region, we can now work to identify how it produces its effects and test whether manipulating its neural activity can mitigate these ASD symptoms.” Source:RIKENJournal reference:Watanabe, T. et al. (2019) A neuroanatomical substrate linking perceptual stability to cognitive rigidity in autism. Journal of Neuroscience. doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2831-18.2019last_img read more

Virtual reality training to help catch drug trafficking

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Provided by CORDIS New Way of Measuring ‘Reality’ of Virtual Worlds Could Lead To Better Business Tools World drug usage is growing significantly every year. So is drug trafficking: Although the value of this market is difficult to calculate, experts evaluate it at approximately USD $400 billion. The amount of work this implies for investigators is mind-bending. It also means that, to be effective in their jobs, these investigators need to be well-trained in various disciplines, as well as have the means to cooperate with their peers in other countries. The LAW-TRAIN (Mixed-reality environment for training teams in joint investigative interrogation-Intelligent interrogation training simulator) project aims to fill existing gaps, with a virtual investigation training system jointly developed by universities, governments and relevant companies.”We know that training by role-playing is very beneficial. But doing it with a team of senior law-enforcement personnel from different European countries is very difficult: all are very busy and located in different places,” says Prof. Sarit Kraus, coordinator of the project for Bar Ilan University in Israel.Thanks to LAW-TRAIN, investigators will soon benefit from a virtual reality training platform that allows them to remain in their country while interacting with other team members across Europe. Each training session consists of four phases: individual preparation, where the trainee receives information about the case; joint preparation, where the trainee can exchange information and shape a joint strategy with his or her peers; investigative interview, where one or two trainees get to interview the virtual suspect in the presence of an equally virtual lawyer; and debriefing/evaluation. The use of virtual reality (VR) is focused on phase three and makes use of the Oculus Rift headset.”Recruiting a person to play the role of the suspect is difficult, so LAW-TRAIN provides a virtual suspect that the team can interview,” Prof. Kraus explains. “Besides, we provide various tools for the trainers: LAW-TRAIN supports many scenarios and enables the creation of new ones. It provides statistics on the trainees’ performance and includes a virtual trainer who can comment on the trainees’ performance and any deviation from the European ethical guidelines online.”These aspects of LAW-TRAIN make for as many different modules, all developed by project partners and mediated by an exchange server. Each module was, of course, developed in close cooperation with end-users. “They love it,” Prof. Kraus enthuses. “The system was presented at the MILIPOL conference to dozens of end-users who were enthusiastic and are now awaiting commercialisation.” The system will be available on various platforms. All it requires for working is a fast local computer and a secure Internet site for activities such as video conferences and information analysis. Before LAW-TRAIN makes it to the market, the team intends to continue testing the system with end-users and improving its modules until the project comes to an end in April 2018. “We are also looking for even more innovation beyond the goals set in this project, hoping to develop them as well in the future,” Prof. Kraus says. Since LAW-TRAIN has been designed as a generic engine, the development of scenarios for other types of illegal activities as well as other cross-border teamwork training is very likely. Explore further Citation: Virtual reality training to help catch drug trafficking (2018, February 9) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-virtual-reality-drug-trafficking.html More information: www.law-train.eu/ read more

New service aims to follow users across multiple devices

Explore further Some 60 companies including such leading brands as Subway, Sprint and the NFL are joining forces to help each other follow you around online. Less is more as companies explore shopping by voice © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This June 21, 2017, file photo shows Adobe software displayed at a store in Hialeah, Fla. A new service aims to help marketers follow you around by linking discrete activities online, such as visiting Subway’s website on a computer and checking the NFL’s app on a phone. Adobe announced the new initiative Wednesday, March 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz, File) Adobe, a company better known for Photoshop and PDF files, says the new Device Co-op initiative it is organizing will help companies offer more personalized experiences and make ads less annoying by filtering out products and services you have already bought or will never buy. Under the initiative, Adobe can tell you’re the same person on a home PC, a work laptop, a phone and a tablet by analyzing past sign-ins with member companies.The initiative comes amid heightened privacy sensitivities after reports that Facebook allowed a political consulting firm, Cambridge Analytica, to harvest data on millions of Facebook users to influence elections. Facebook also has been criticized for collecting call and text logs from phones running Google’s Android system.Adobe’s initiative underscores the role data plays in helping companies make money. Many of the initial uses are for better ad targeting.The company timed Wednesday’s announcement to a digital marketing conference it is hosting this week in Las Vegas. Adobe executives said they believed their initiative offers strong privacy safeguards and weren’t worried about a backlash in light of the Facebook scandal.”With this stuff coming out now around Cambridge Analytica and Facebook, the bar has to be so high in terms of privacy,” Adobe executive Amit Ahuja said.Adobe says no personal data is being exchanged among participating companies, which also include Allstate, Lenovo, Intel, Barnes & Noble, Subaru and the Food Network. Adobe says the program links about 300 million consumers across nearly 2 billion devices in the U.S. and Canada.The program would let Sprint, for instance, know that Bob is already a customer when he visits from a new device. Bob wouldn’t get a promotion to switch from another carrier, but might get instead a phone upgrade offer. Or if Mary has declared herself a Giants fan on the NFL’s app, she might see ads with Giants banners when visiting NFL.com from a laptop for the first time.All this might feel creepy, but such cross-device tracking is already commonly done by matching attributes such as devices that from the same internet location, or IP address. Consumers typically have little control over it.Adobe says it will give consumers a chance to opt out of such tracking. And it’s breaking industry practices in a few ways. Adobe says it will honor opt-out requests for all participating companies and for all devices at once. It’s more typical for such setups to require people do so one by one. All companies in the initiative are listed on Adobe’s website, a break from some companies’ practice of referring only to unspecified partners.”We’re doing everything we can not letting brands hide themselves,” Ahuja said.But in taking an opt-out approach, which is common in the industry, Adobe assumes that users consent. And it places the burden on consumers to learn about this initiative and to figure out how they can opt out of it. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: New service aims to follow users across multiple devices (2018, March 28) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-aims-users-multiple-devices.html read more