Buying meaningful gifts is goal of business owners

first_imgTo put in the extra effort Amato speaks of does mean thinking and shopping early – as in, right now.“I don’t want to worry about the company I’m ordering from running out of anything,” Amato said.Kevin McLaughlin has relied on feedback from gift recipients to come up with what he believes to be the most appreciated gift: food.Not only do clients and vendors express their thanks, when staffers from his company visit the other firms, “we see our food in the break room and people going after it,” he said.McLaughlin, a principal of Princeton, N.J.-based Resound Marketing, recalled that one year, his firm was late getting the gifts out. NEW YORK – The boutique owners around the country who are Kristen Amato’s customers will be getting fluffy, monogrammed terry bathrobes for the holidays – there will be no mugs with her company’s name on them.“I hate that – I will never do that,” Amato said of the gift that so many small businesses give at the holidays. In the past, she’s given gift certificates for cooking classes and personalized stationery to customers.“Just putting that extra effort in shows the client or customer that you took the time out to appreciate them, not just sending something very simple,” said Amato, owner of K. Amato, a jewelry-manufacturing company based in Chicago.Amato’s approach to gift-giving is one that small-business owners take when they want a gift to be a meaningful part of a business relationship – not just some cookie-cutter knickknack that smacks of an owner just going through the motions. And one longtime client called to ask if the tower of cookies was going to arrive, since her employees were looking forward to getting it.And that’s the beauty of food gifts, McLaughlin said. It’s not just the owner or CEO of a company that will enjoy the gift; many employees will get to share in the gift, and that contributes to an even better relationship with a client or vendor.And the ubiquitous mug? “So many of these tchotchkes go to their kids, they go into the toy box, or they drop them off at Goodwill,” McLaughlin said.Still, many business owners like the idea of mugs because they are marketing tools, serving as reminders of a company. Or, they like T-shirts that become mobile ads when they’re worn (although so many are automatically turned out in size XL that they often end up as pajamas for a spouse or child).Ron Park, managing partner of Park Fowler & Co., a Corpus Christi, Texas-based accounting firm, recognizes the value of putting his company’s name on a gift. But he also is looking for something unique. So this year, he’ll be sending his 50 biggest clients flash drives, which are small computer-data-storage devices.Park got the idea because clients were sending in their tax information to his office not on paper, but on flash drives. Most said, “don’t lose it now, I have to have this back,” Park recalled.So this gift will be useful, memorable, help build his firm’s client relationships and help accomplish a little marketing as well.At Uproar, a Seattle-based public relations and marketing firm, the philosophy is that gifts should complement, but never supplant, the most important part of customer and client relations.“The best thing we can do for our clients is to be responsive, do great work, go the extra mile,” said Anita Lavine, a media-relations specialist at Uproar. Gifts are “for times when we want to just show our appreciation.”Like Amato, at Uproar “we try to select things that hit a personal note,” Lavine said.So gifts in the past have included flowering bonsai trees and flowering teapots. Or, if Uproar executives are aware that a particular client has been having a hard time, the gift could be a spa certificate.Many company owners hope that a gift will result in more business in the future – probably all the more reason to make a gift unique.But Lavine said her company isn’t counting on revenue growth from gifts. “I don’t think that we give gifts with that sort of intention; the purpose is to show appreciation,” she said.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Windows and doors damaged in daylight burglary

first_imgAnother home was targeted last weekend in a recent spate of burglaries in Ballybofey and Stranorlar.The Twin Towns region has had a number of homes and businesses broken into in the past month.The latest crime occurred on Sunday 14th April, when a home at Dooish was ransacked during daylight hours. Thieves gained entry to the house between the hours of 4pm and 11pm. Damage was caused to the back door, the kitchen window and an upstairs bathroom window.Nothing was taken in the incident, according to Gardaí.An appeal has been launched for witnesses to report any sightings or suspicious activity to  Letterkenny Garda Station on 0749167100.The public can also assist with the investigation in confidence by calling the Garda Confidential Line on 1800 666 111  Windows and doors damaged in daylight burglary was last modified: April 16th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Ballybofeyburglarycrimedooishlast_img read more

Scientific Method Evolves

first_img(Visited 20 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The so-called “scientific method” (if there is such a thing) has undergone dramatic changes throughout history, but there is one constant that can be relied upon: the myth of scientism.Scientism is the belief that the “scientific method” is a disinterested formula that, provided a bias-free scientist follows the steps, is guaranteed to lead to knowledge that progresses toward understanding of nature that invariably improves over time.  Philosophers of science, historians of science and sociologists of science know that this simplistic description is a myth.  On the 50th anniversary of Thomas Kuhn’s Structure of Scientific Revolutions this year, and the “Science Wars” that ensued in the decades following its publication in 1962, one would think that scientism went out with logical positivism and vinyl records, but some reporters remain stuck in that groove.  A recent example is found on Live Science, where Robert Roy Britt and and Kim Ann Zimmermann provided a definition straight out of the 1950s:Science is a systematic and logical approach to discovering how things in the universe work. It is derived from the Latin word “scientia,” which translates to knowledge. Unlike the arts, science aims for measurable results through testing and analysis. Science is based on fact, not opinion or preferences. The process of science is designed to challenge ideas through research. It is not meant to prove theories, but rule out alternative explanations until a likely conclusion is reached.This definition, followed by a step-by-step “recipe” for the Scientific Method, reveals none of the complexities of real-world science.  For instance, not all scientists  follow this method, if indeed any do.  Different fields of science use different methods.  It overlooks tacit knowledge, hunches and social pressures that short-circuit the method.  It mentions nothing of the scientific culture or consensus, Kuhn’s paradigms and scientific revolutions.  It conflates scientific discovery with scientific understanding, yet it distinguishes facts from theories as if facts cannot be theory-laden.  It ignores profound differences between operational sciences (which can be replicated) and origins sciences (which cannot, but rely on inference).  And it creates an either-or fallacy that segregates “science” from all other forms of inquiry, some of which are not only just as systematic and logical, but may be even more measurable, reliable, and amenable to knowledge.  Those are just a few of the questions that arise from the Live Science article.Even the article’s ending section, “brief history of science,” overlooks the fact that what was considered “knowledge” in the past is often considered foolishness today.  Almost everything that was believed about the universe, the earth and life back in 1900 has been debunked.  We have no guarantee, therefore, that scientists of the future will not look on today’s “scientific” beliefs as foolishness.  The phrase “now we know” is often the prelude to collapse (for an interesting example from geology, read a quote posted by Uncommon Descent).Britt and Zimmermann also neglected to address how scientific knowledge is manufactured.  There was nothing about peer review, for instance.  Yet even Nature this past week acknowledged that a revolution is underway in peer review with new internet resources that may render traditional print journals obsolete.  On June 12, Richard van Noorden explored some of the radical new initiatives like PeerJ (an outgrowth of the inventors of PLoS ONE) that will allow scientists to pay one price for unlimited online publishing.  Notice his explosive metaphor:PeerJ is just one of a flurry of experiments, encouraged in part by the gathering momentum of open access, that might shape the future of research publishing. “We are seeing a Cambrian explosion of experiments with new publishing models. It’s going to be an interesting period for the next few years,” says Binfield.The metaphor implies no clear connection between the old way and several radical new ways of publication.  This example shows that one aspect of the “scientific method,” peer review, is undergoing a dramatic change before our eyes after decades — even centuries — of standard operating procedure.Another example from Nature confesses  that there may be limits to our understanding.  Climate change certainly looms large in scientific discussions these days.  Just  as the latest global climate change conference is concluding in Rio, Maslin and Austin said in Nature June 14 (486, pp. 183–184, doi:10.1038/486183a) that climate models may have reached their limits:For the fifth major assessment of climate science by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), due to be released next year, climate scientists face a serious public-image problem. The climate models they are now working with, which make use of significant improvements in our understanding of complex climate processes, are likely to produce wider rather than smaller ranges of uncertainty in their predictions. To the public and to policymakers, this will look as though the scientific understanding of climate change is becoming less, rather than more, clear….…. Why do models have a limited capability to predict the future? First of all, they are not reality. This is perhaps an obvious point, but it is regularly ignored. By their very nature, models cannot capture all the factors involved in a natural system, and those that they do capture are often incompletely understood. Science historian Naomi Oreskes of the University of California, San Diego, and her colleagues have argued convincingly that this makes climate models impossible to truly verify or validate. Surprisingly, they stated that ignorance is no reason for inaction:Scientists need to decide how to explain this effect. Above all, the public and policymakers need to be made to understand that climate models may have reached their limit. They must stop waiting for further certainty or persuasion, and simply act.This statement appears to be naked advocacy for political action in spite of scientific understanding.  Regardless of one’s views on human-caused global warming, the quote illustrates powerful influences between politics and science.  It also reveals that scientists, like other fallible human beings, are not necessarily bias-free, but are subject to motivations and collective beliefs.Update 6/19/2012: Pallab Ghosh, writing for the BBC News, reported on the growing trend toward open-access journals on the internet, away from traditional subscription-based journals.  One of the arguments in favor of open access is that if the public is paying for the research, they ought to be able to read about it.  Some scientists are strongly in favor of the movement, seeing it as the democratization of science.  “Critics have argued that commercial publishers have made excessive profits from scientific research that has been paid for from public money,” Ghosh wrote.  “Critics also say that denying access to publicly-funded research is immoral.”  One significant upshot of the trend is that leading journal editors will have less veto power over what gets published, and less control over what kind of research is deemed significant.Don’t ever be fooled into assuming that scientists, and especially science reporters, have been educated out of scientism.  Many scientists never took a philosophy of science course.  Some of them, influenced by their science professors, were trained to distrust philosophers of science.  But the question “What is science?” is not a question of science.  It is a question of philosophy about science.  Scientists therefore, operating within the scientific culture, are the least qualified to answer the question.It’s time to suggest again two Teaching Company lecture series that explore in detail the philosophical issues of the “scientific method.”  Here are links to them.  Take note that the courses periodically go on sale.Kasser, Philosophy of ScienceGoldman, Science Wars: What Scientists Know and How They Know ItNotice that neither professors are friendly to intelligent design; they both accept Darwinian evolution.  But after listening to them explain the many difficulties in verifying even the simplest scientific concepts, and hearing about the welter of contradictory opinions about what science is, and how misguided previous “now we know” claims have been, no reader of Creation-Evolution Headlines should remain vulnerable to the fallacy of scientism.last_img read more

SA urged to stand up against rape

first_img12 February 2013 The Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) has added its voice to the national call for South Africans to get involved and take a firm stand against rape and all forms of violence against women and children. GCIS staff members took to the streets of Pretoria on Monday in a bid to increase community awareness about the scourge of rape. Carrying placards with messages such as “No means no”, “Say no to rape”, “Real men don’t rape”, “Don’t look away: report and act against rape”, staff members interacted with the public, handing out pamphlets with toll-free helpline numbers for Crime Stop and Childline, among others. The pamphlets also had information on steps individuals and communities could take to protect themselves. “We are calling on society to be active participants and unite against the abuse of women,” said acting GCIS CEO Phumla Williams. “Government alone cannot do it.” “As the GCIS, we want to empower the public with the information . We want everybody to be part of the campaign.” Williams emphasised the need to empower people in South Africa’s rural areas, saying they had to be better equipped to report incidences of rape. The campaign’s message resonated with members of the public. Lillian Raophala (25), a student in one of the colleges in the Pretoria city centre, said she fully supported the campaign. “Women should be free and they must report incidences of rape,” she said. Thabang Phago from Mamelodi, east of Pretoria, said rape should not be tolerated. “As men, we need to unite against such acts,” he said. The campaign was triggered by recent rape cases, the most recent being that of Anene Booysen (17), who was raped and mutilated in Bredasdorp in the Western Cape. She was found at a construction site on Saturday, 2 February, left for dead by her attackers. She died later that day from her injuries. One of Booysen’s alleged killers appeared before the Bredasdorp Magistrate’s Court on Monday. Three people, all from Bredasdorp, have been arrested in connection with Booysen’s death. Booysen was buried at the weekend. Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

Smit Lamnalco Wins 10Year FLNG Services Deal in Mozambique

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Eni Marine services company Smit Lamnalco has been awarded a 10-year contract with additional extension options by Coral FLNG to provide integrated marine services to the first Mozambique floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) terminal.The development marks the first terminal services contract award for the Mozambique offshore LNG developments.The contract value for Smit Lamnalco amounts to around USD 200 million and services will commence early 2022.For the delivery of its services, the company will deploy three new 95 ton bollard pull tugs to provide escort, berthing and unberthing services to LNG carriers at the FLNG facility. A new offshore support vessel will be utilized to provide logistical and marine services support.Coral FLNG is a consortium of ENI, ExxonMobil, CNPC, Kogas, Galp Energia and ENH. The FLNG terminal is located some 80 kilometers offshore Palma Bay and operates in a water depth of 2,000 meters.last_img read more

New Yorks Spitzer Wins Three ASME Awards

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO—New York magazine’s stunning visual takedown of disgraced governor Eliot Spitzer won three awards given by American Society of Magazine Editors and announced here Monday at the American Magazine Conference.The March 24 cover won cover of the year, best news cover and best coverline for its minimal, arrow-aided “Brain.” The regional also won an award for best leisure interest cover for its photo illustration of Barack Obama and John McCain sharing in a beach-side “fist-bump.”Texas Monthly also won two awards, capturing best celebrity cover and personal service cover for its June issue, “Top 50 BBQ Joints in Texas.” New York’s fashion spin-off, Look, and Vanity Fair shared the award for best fashion cover.The New Yorker won the ASME award for best concept cover for its “Eustace Tillarobama” illustration.Click here to view ASME’s cover image gallery.last_img read more

POLICE LOG for January 19 Driver Going 75 MPH On Shawsheen Shoplifting

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are highlights from the Wilmington Police Log for Saturday, January 19, 2019:A 2-vehicle crash took place on Lowell Street, near the 93 North on-ramp. One of the vehicle’s occupants was injured and transported to Lahey Clinic. (9:25am)Billerica Police reported a black Tesla traveling down 129 into Wilmington going approximately 75 MPH, just passing Shawsheen School. Police located the vehicle and spoke with the driver, making him aware of the complaint and reminding him of his driver expectations. (2:28pm)Target’s Security Manager reported a female party was recorded on camera shoplifting last night. (4:40pm)A caller reported four pick-up trucks doing donuts in the Market Basket parking lot. Trucks were gone by the time police arrived. (11:03pm)(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPOLICE LOG for August 12: 2 Drivers Issued Summonses; Drone FoundIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 18: 2 Vehicles With Same License Plate; Statue Missing From Wildwood CemeteryIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 24: Motorcycle Crash; Package Stolen; Speeding on Shawsheen Ave.In “Police Log”last_img read more

Facebook Google Twitter sign Christchurch Call to cull terrorist content

first_img1:40 0 Now playing: Watch this: Post a comment Share your voice Google, Twitter and Facebook all signed the Christchurch Call. Getty Images Tech giants and political leaders from around the globe came together in Paris on Wednesday to pledge their commitment to tackling the spread of terrorist content online, following the attack in Christchurch, New Zealand, in March.In a summit hosted jointly by French President Emmanuel Macron and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, companies including Facebook, Twitter and Google agreed to sign the “Christchurch Call.” The pledge was created in response to the New Zealand terrorist using Facebook to livestream part of the murders of 51 people at two mosques. The tech giants also agreed to a nine-point plan that outlined ways they’re going to work more collaboratively than they have in the past to combat this problem.The move highlights how tech companies plan to take action after failing to stop the live video of the New Zealand attack from spreading on social media sites. The video was viewed many times around the world before it was removed. More than a month after the attack, videos of the attack were still found to be circulating online, illustrating just how hard it is for tech companies to control the spread of viral tragedies. Eight tech companies signed the Christchurch Call, including Microsoft, Amazon and YouTube, along with 17 national governments and the EU. But one significant name is missing from the list of supporters — the White House announced it would not be signing the commitment due to free speech concerns.The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy issued a statement that said while the US supports the goals of the Christchurch Call, it’s “not currently in a position to join the endorsement.””We continue to be proactive in our efforts to counter terrorist content online while also continuing to respect freedom of expression and freedom of the press,” the statement reads.Supporters of the call said in a joint statement that signing the pledge will strengthen partnerships between governments, society and tech companies.”Terrorism and violent extremism are complex societal problems that require an all-of-society response,” supporters said in the statement. Tech giants also said they would be taking actions individually to combat terrorist content. That includes updating their rules against terrorist content, giving users ways to report terrorist and violent extremist content, investing in technology, checking who is livestreaming and publishing reports that include the amount of terrorist and violent content that’s detected and removed. The companies could vet who is streaming a live video by including ratings for people who use the tool and looking at an account’s activity. On Tuesday, Facebook said it would ban users from livestreaming for a period of time if they’ve broken certain rules on the social network, including its policy against terrorist content. The company has pushed back against other ideas though, such as delaying the broadcast of a live video. The companies that support the pledge also outlined steps that will help them work better together. Those actions include sharing data and tools to improve technology aimed at combating terrorist content and educating users about how to report the offensive content and why they shouldn’t spread it online. The companies also plan to support research into combatting hate and bigotry and creating a system for responding quickly to an emerging or active event. Originally published May 15, 9:40 a.m. PT.Update, 10:39 a.m. PT: Adds White House statement.Update, 12:27 p.m. PT: Adds more background. center_img Tags YouTube sets rules for terrorism gray-zone videos Internet Services Tech Industry Facebook Google Twitterlast_img read more

Tata Group Launches ECommerce Portal Exclusively for its Employees

first_imgIndia’s largest business house Tata Group aims to take advantage of its huge employee base to drive revenues by launching an e-commerce portal exclusively for its employees to sell a range of goods. The $103-billion conglomerate is testing the online retailing initiative – mytatastore.com  – on a pilot basis that will cover its five lakh employees. “It’s an internal merchandise store for Tata employees across geographies. The thought behind launching it on “tataworld”, the group intranet, was to make Tata branded merchandise easily available to our internal stakeholders across Tata companies,” a Tata Sons spokesperson told The Economic Times.Besides, one of its group companies Tata Steel is rolling out ‘Tata Steel eshoppe’ for its stakeholders. “There was a huge demand from vendors and distributors who wanted to be associated with the Tata Steel brand,” said Viresh Oberoi, managing director and chief executive of mjunction services, a joint venture between steel giants Tata Steel and SAIL.Initially, the online store will offer Tata Steel branded merchandise such as mugs, backpacks, handicrafts, shirts, organisers, T-shirts and books. “We would like the initiative to stabilise in India. The first 10 days of operations have been very encouraging and has attracted close to 2,000 registrations,” Tata Steel MD (India & South East Asia), TV Narendran said.”The practice of involving employees for understanding the market will set the trend for many such corporates in future,” Manisha Rao, Delhi-based retail consultant, said. India is expected to become the second-largest digital market globally by 2030, with China being at first place, according to a report by Goldman Sachs.The banker estimates the country’s e-commerce market to grow 15 times to $300 billion by then, accounting for about 2.5% of the gross domestic product (GDP).last_img read more

Who are Indias Top Ten highest paid executives SLIDESHOW

first_imgAditya PuriMD, HDFC Bank32.8 Navin AgarwalChairman, Vedanta15.1 D.B. GuptaChairman, Lupin37.6 Sunil MittalChairman, Bharti Airtel27.2 Pawan MunjalCMD & CEO, Hero MotoCorp43.9 Rajiv BajajMD, Bajaj Auto20.5 With Infosys filing its annual report for 2015-2016, its executive pay package information is out in the open. Vishal Sikka, the CEO and MD of the Bengaluru-based IT services exporter, took home a salary package of Rs. 48.73 crore in 2015-16. His basic salary was Rs. 5.96 crore, while variable pay, inclusive of bonus, retirals and others, amounted to Rs. 42.77 crore, according to the disclosures in the annual report. The variable pay component included Rs. 14 crore for the financial year 2014-15.Sikka will get about a 50 percent hike in remuneration for 2016-2017. The company approved a compensation of $11 million (about Rs. 74 crore) in February this year.Yet, his compensation will be less when compared to that of Francisco D’Souza, CEO of Cognizant Technology Solutions, who took home $12 million in 2015, the Economic Times reported. It would be interesting here to know India’s top 10 highest paid CEOs in 2014-15 as reported by the Business Standard. (Their earnings for 2015-16 will be available when the companies file their annual reports for the year).   NameNameCompanyCompanySalary (Rs. Crore)Salary (Rs. Crore)NameC.P. GurnaniCompanyMD & CEO, Tech MahindraSalary (Rs. Crore)165.6NamePawan MunjalCompanyCMD & CEO, Hero MotoCorpSalary (Rs. Crore)43.9NameD.B. GuptaCompanyChairman, LupinSalary (Rs. Crore)37.6NameAditya PuriCompanyMD, HDFC BankSalary (Rs. Crore)32.8NameSunil MittalCompanyChairman, Bharti AirtelSalary (Rs. Crore)27.2NameN. ChandrasekeranCompanyCEO & MD, TCSSalary (Rs. Crore)21.3NameRajiv BajajCompanyMD, Bajaj AutoSalary (Rs. Crore)20.5NameK.M. BirlaCompanyChairman & Non-executive director, UltraTechSalary (Rs. Crore)19NameY.C. DeveshwarCompanyChairman & Wholetime Director, ITCSalary (Rs. Crore)15.3NameNavin AgarwalCompanyChairman, VedantaSalary (Rs. Crore)15.1center_img K.M. BirlaChairman & Non-executive director, UltraTech19 Y.C. DeveshwarChairman & Wholetime Director, ITC15.3 C.P. GurnaniMD & CEO, Tech Mahindra165.6 N. ChandrasekeranCEO & MD, TCS21.3 NameCompanySalary (Rs. Crore)last_img read more