ON THIS WEEKEND

first_imgSaturday9 a.m.: Sunderland vs Chelsea4 p.m.: West Ham vs Swansea6 p.m.: Aston Villa vs Newcastle9 p.m.: Bournemouth vs West Brom11 p.m.: Crystal Palace vs StokeSunday7:30 a.m.: Tottenham vs Southampton10 a.m.: Man City vs Arsenal4 p.m.: Liverpool vs WatfordSPORTSMAX SPORTSMAX2 Sunday11:30 a.m.: Leicester vs Evertonlast_img

Hey, Facebook! Connecting The World To The Web Isn’t Enough

first_imgServerless Backups: Viable Data Protection for … Cloud Hosting for WordPress: Why Everyone is Mo… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting selena larson Tags:#City of Chicago#Facebook#internet.org center_img How Intelligent Data Addresses the Chasm in Cloud Facebook’s new Internet.org initiative is the latest in a series of ambitious tech-company plans to solve a global problem: the lack of Internet connectivity across the developing world, and even poorer areas of industrialized nations. Too bad it’s so short on the issue of how to get there from here.The initiative began with founding members Facebook, Ericsson, MediaTek, Nokia, Opera, Qualcomm and Samsung, eventually government and industry leaders will also be involved.But Facebook might be able to take some pointers from an unlikely source: The city of Chicago.First, some background. Last week, Facebook teamed up with six telecom companies to launch Internet.org, a project that vaguely promises to make the Internet available to everyone on Earth, specifically focusing on underdeveloped countries. Facebook’s interest isn’t entirely altruistic; like most all the companies working on similar projects, including Google, it has a business incentive. The social network has begun expanding in the developing world with its Facebook for Every Phone program, which now boasts 100 million users every month. It’s not just the emerging countries that remain largely disconnected. About 20 percent of U.S. adults don’t use the Internet at home, work, school or by mobile device. The Obama administration is making a push to expand online access to citizens, and there are many efforts in marginalized communities to make that happen.Extending Internet access to the world’s underserved communities is a noble cause, but it won’t do much good unless people also have the resources to use it to improve their education, economic development and elevate their communities out of poverty. And so far, Internet.org hasn’t had much to say on that score.The City of Chicago may have an answer. One program, called Smart Communities, offers a blueprint that could help bring impoverished nations into the 21st century. Chicago’s Smart CommunitiesTo tackle the digital divide, Chicago has changed the digital landscape of lower-income communities—bolstered by $6.8 million in federal stimulus funds in 2010.The Smart Communities project, a program supported by the City of Chicago and a variety of community-driven organizations, set out to increase Internet connectivity in five moderate to low-income neighborhoods by educating residents on the importance and value of technology and providing the tools they need to access it.After two years, the success was substantial. Over 30,000 households have adopted broadband through this program and over 14,000 people have gone through technology training. People in Smart Communities are 15 percent more likely to be online compared to those in similar neighborhoods.   What numbers don’t tell us is that many people who have gone through the program have gained increases in pay, received new jobs, and connected with their family members across the world. Smart Communities has also sparked new computer-related education and training efforts.One such story is Englewood Codes, a 10-week summer program that teaches teens how to build a computer with the Raspberry Pi and then design multimedia websites. Its Kickstarter campaign raised almost double the initial ask of $5,500.Build Trust In The CommunitySo what can this program teach tech giants like Facebook about closing the digital divide on a global scale? Smart Communities garnered the support of the neighborhoods it would be servicing by partnering with economic development and community organizations that had already built trust with the residents.  “We really asked the community what their goals were,” said Francesca Rodriquez, a director at the City of Chicago’s department of innovation and technology. “They didn’t go out and prescribe for the community, the community prescribed for them.”No matter how beneficial to education and economic welfare an initiative is, companies might see push back from residents if they try to force connectivity down residents’ throats. If Facebook and Google want to make an impact in impoverished areas across the globe, it’s imperative to begin building trust within the local communities. Chicago advertised Smart Communities by showcasing success stories.Offer Education “Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day; show him how to catch fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.”The message is timeless. But the medium is quite different in the modern era.Smart Communities program hosted over 1,000 trainings to educate both adults and youth how to use computers and mobile devices, including setting up profiles on social media, Microsoft Office training and how to find access to city resources. Classes in Spanish proved to be a tremendous asset to the program, as two of the communities were predominately Hispanic.The program distributed laptops and software to 1280 residents who had gone through technology trainings and supplied 100 businesses with desktop computers. In addition to providing hardware, the city partnered with companies including HP and Sprint to set up large Internet kiosks in public locations throughout the communities and provide WiFi cards to give individuals access at home.Any benevolent organization can give people a computer or smartphone and say that they have done their duty to expanding knowledge across the world. It is quite another thing to teach them to use those tools to help improve their lives.Understand Why People Need TechnologyIn today’s hyper-connected American society, it’s hard to fathom why anyone would want to be disconnected. But there are still many Americans that don’t use the Internet. For the city of Chicago, Rodriguez said it was essential to the program’s success to have data on why people don’t use the Internet.Are people concerned about the cost? Are they frustrated by lack of knowledge and skills? What if they just don’t fundamentally understand why this Internet thing is in the first place? By understanding the reasons why people don’t use the Internet, workshops can be tailored to address what the community needs the most. Although residents had the ability to connect with broadband access, many of them chose not to use it. For Chicago’s neighborhoods, cost was the largest factor deterring Internet use, surprisingly followed by a lack of interest with almost 40 percent of respondents showing no desire to be connected. Internet.org wants to bring Internet to people like Jennifer in Ghana, a lofty goal considering the immense poverty plaguing many global communities. Photo credit: Selena LarsonLooking To The FutureEducating a disconnected community isn’t cheap. While bold in their goals, the Smart Communities program might have to restructure their ambitions when the initial funding runs out on September 30. Between hardware, staff and curriculum, the costs can add up quickly.The challenge in most altruistic endeavors is that while hearts are in the right place, checkbooks are not. Facebook and its partners have yet to disclose how exactly Internet.org will be funded, but if it took Chicago almost $7 million to come this far, the early cost projections for connecting the world must be substantial.The creators of Chicago’s Smart Communities did so with the purpose of elevating the community. The economic benefit to the city might have marginally increased, but it was the altruistic nature of the program that really drove success.This is where Internet.org partners might find a hiccup. Although Mark Zuckerberg claims the intentions are charitable, it would be remiss to overlook the potential revenue an additional 5 billion connected people would bring. If the project survives, it will be on the shoulders of the companies’ good intentions. Otherwise, when the project hits a significant financial snag, they might turn and run.Of course these two initiatives are fundamentally different. Families living in Chicago’s underserved communities still live in a nation that is well connected and provides tremendous opportunities to rise out of poverty, while many of the people Internet.org will be serving face much larger struggles. However, if we look exclusively at the technology and structure behind the initiatives that focus on closing the digital gap, a fully connected world seems possible.  Related Posts last_img read more

Sexual harassment rates are above national average in California reports study

first_imgCalifornia has led the nation’s focus on the #MeToo and #TimesUp movement. This report offers a stark look at the widespread prevalence of verbal, physical and cyber-based sexual harassment in the Golden State.”Anita Raj, PhD, professor in the Department of Medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine and director of GEH More than 86 percent of women in California (compared with 81 percent nationally) and 53 percent of men (compared with 43 percent nationally) report having experienced some form of sexual harassment and/or assault in their lifetime. Three out of four foreign-born men reported harassment compared to one out of two U.S.-born men living in the state. Four out of five lesbian and bisexual women have faced sexual assault compared with one in four straight women. Three out of four gay and bisexual men have faced aggressive sexual harassment (e.g., stalking, unwanted sexual touching) compared with one out of three straight men. Related StoriesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaSmarter, more educated people get a cognitive ‘head start’, but aren’t protected from Alzheimer’sIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyGEH is an academic center focused on public health and social science research and methods to build evidence on gender inequities and health, and how to tackle inequities for better health outcomes.Raj and co-authors said “Measuring #MeToo in California, 2019: A Statewide Assessment of Sexual Harassment and Assault” marks the first statewide analysis on the prevalence and scope of sexual harassment and assault in California. They will release their report Thursday, May 23. The team has, for the past two years, also released a nationwide study exploring the same data points across the entire United States.The California-focused study found that overall Californians who identify as gay or lesbian, as well as male Californians who were born outside of the United States, are at higher risk of experiencing sexual harassment and assault.Specific findings: Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 24 2019In the state of California, reported incidences of sexual harassment are 5 percent higher for women and 10 percent higher for men than the national average, report the authors of a joint study produced by the Center for Gender Equity and Health (GEH) at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and the nonprofit organization California Coalition Against Sexual Assault (CALCASA).center_img “This report demonstrates that sexual harassment is prevalent and ubiquitous, but at the same time, we also see higher rates on some of our most marginalized residents, such as gay, lesbian and bisexual people and foreign-born men,” said Raj.David S. Lee, director of prevention, CALCASA, said that the study offers yet another confirmation of the desperate need for education about sexual consent.”Prevention efforts, including education in schools as early as possible, around issues of consent and harassment are crucial,” said Lee. “We know that prevention works, and it’s necessary to shift to a culture where individuals look out for one another.” Source:University of California San Diegolast_img read more

Audi to pay mega fine in VWs latest dieselgate fallout

first_img Volkswagen drops Audi chief accused of diesel fraud This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further The Audi fine closes one dieselgate chapter for VW, but it’s not in the clear yet Citation: Audi to pay mega fine in VW’s latest dieselgate fallout (2018, October 16) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-audi-mega-fine-vw-latest.htmlcenter_img © 2018 AFP In a statement, Volkswagen said high-end manufacturer Audi had agreed to pay an 800-million-euro ($927 million) fine issued by Munich prosecutors.”Audi AG has accepted the fine” for “deviations from regulatory requirements in certain V6 and V8 diesel aggregates (motors) and diesel vehicles”, the group said.In their own communique, Munich prosecutors confirmed their so-called “administrative proceeding” against Audi was now “closed.”VW admitted in 2015 to building so-called “defeat devices” into 11 million cars worldwide, in a massive cheating scandal dubbed “dieselgate”.Software allowed vehicles to appear to meet emissions rules under lab conditions, while in fact spewing many times more harmful gases like nitrogen oxides (NOx) on the road.Tuesday’s fine brings the total costs to Volkswagen from dieselgate to more than 28 billion euros since 2015—most of that in penalties, buybacks and refits in the United States.VW paid a one-billion-euro penalty to Brunswick prosecutors in June over its own-brand vehicles.The fines leave just sports car subsidiary Porsche still facing an “administrative” diesel case among the group’s companies.And while the June fine flowed into a total of 1.6 billion euros paid out over dieselgate in the second quarter, the car giant reported profits up 3.4 percent year-on-year between April and June, at 3.3 billion.Relieved investors welcomed the Audi news, with Volkswagen shares rebounding from an initial drop to gain 2.5 percent at 148 euros by 12:50 pm (1050 GMT).Managers on the hookDespite Tuesday’s agreement, other probes against individual managers and executives from the VW group remain open.Targets include former chief executives Martin Winterkorn and Matthias Mueller, present VW boss Herbert Diess and supervisory board chairman Hans Dieter Poetsch.At Audi itself, former chief executive Rupert Stadler was removed from his post by VW earlier this month.Prosecutors had jailed him in June, saying this was necessary to stop him trying to influence witnesses in his case over fraud and issuing false certificates.In a Brunswick court case, investors are pursuing Volkswagen with claims totalling some 9.0 billion euros over the shares’ 40-percent plunge in value in the days after “dieselgate” was unveiled.They say executives should have informed them sooner of the risks to the group.And a similar case with a potential billion-euro price tag is underway in Stuttgart against holding company Porsche SE, which owns a controlling stake in VW.Meanwhile the German government has opened a route for car owners to launch collective cases against the manufacturers, with a first one expected for early November.Reshaping industryThe dieselgate fallout is far from confined to Volkswagen alone.German car industry stalwarts like BMW or Mercedes-Benz parent Daimler have also become the targets of official probes, while French-owned Opel was confronted with a new investigation on Monday.What’s more, tough new emissions rules are squeezing carmakers to reduce their fleets’ output of both greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) and harmful NOx.A new EU emissions testing scheme known as WLTP has slowed deliveries of new cars, slashing registrations by 30.5 percent in September.And drivers of older diesels face looming bans from many German city centres as the country scrambles to meet EU air quality targets.”The current campaign against individual mobility and thereby against cars is reaching existential scale,” VW chief executive Herbert Diess complained to a component makers’ conference Monday, business daily Handelsblatt reported.In a study seen by the same paper, the Center of Automotive Management commented more drily that “the fat years for the car industry are over” as a new environment of trade wars and tougher emissions rules bites into sales and margins. Auto giant Volkswagen cleared a new hurdle in its “dieselgate” scandal Tuesday, paying a hefty fine to close a German investigation into subsidiary Audi, but the group is not yet in the clear over its years of emissions cheating.last_img read more

Facebook use eroding in US as social media under pressure

first_img The average amount of time US adults spent at Facebook dropped by three minutes per day last year and will likely decrease by another minute next year, to a total of 37 minutes daily, according to the research firm eMarketer.The report suggests that Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg’s efforts to focus on safety and remove divisive and hateful content could be having an economic impact.”Facebook’s continued loss of younger adult users, along with its focus on down-ranking clickbait posts and videos in favor of those that create ‘time well spent,’ resulted in less daily time spent on the platform in 2018 than we had previously expected,” said eMarketer principal analyst Debra Aho Williamson.”Less time spent on Facebook translates into fewer chances for marketers to reach the network’s users.”Money taken in from digital ads are the leading source of revenue at Facebook, which has 2.4 billion monthly active users around the world.A bright spot for Facebook is that daily US engagement is creeping up at its image and video focused social network Instagram, where eMarketer expected it to rise a minute this year to 27 minutes and then another minute per year through 2021.”Features like Stories, influencer content and video are all contributing to more engagement and a slow but steady uptick in time spent on Instagram,” Williamson said.Meanwhile, time people in the US spend at Instagram rival Snapchat has seemingly plateaued at 26 minutes daily, with an application redesign failing to boost engagement, according to eMarketer.A broader trend seen last year was for Americans to spend less time at online social networks, and the overall engagement was expected by eMarketer to remain unchanged this year at almost one hour, 14 minutes per day.”Gains in digital video viewing are putting pressure on social time, and gaming is also creating new competition for user attention,” Williamson said.”Though we can’t say there is a direct cause-effect relationship, these activities do at least threaten users’ engagement with social media.” Credit: CC0 Public Domain This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Facebook’s efforts to crack down on misinformation and sensational content have reduced the time spent at the leading social network eroding, researchers said Tuesday. Video ad business booming in US: market trackercenter_img © 2019 AFP Explore further Citation: Facebook use eroding in US as social media under pressure (2019, May 28) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-facebook-eroding-social-media-pressure.htmllast_img read more