David Smith freed from GT Prison next faces US Feds

first_img Related Items:David smith, free, grand turk prison, olint, ponzi scheme Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Missick & Co Defendants and David Smith all in Court this Week David Smith returns to court in January; heads back to HMP in Grand Turk Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 22 Jan 2015 – No comment for the media; David Smith who had been serving a six and a half year sentence on four counts of financial crimes namely: two counts of money laundering and two counts of conspiracy to defraud whisked his wife through the Provo International Airport terminal today bound for a private vehicle waiting to take them away from the spotlight. Smith has been incarcerated at the Her Majesty’s Prison in Grand Turk since 2010 and is due to complete a Federal sentence in the United States for similar crimes linked to a $220 million Ponzi scheme exposed in 2008; an Orlando court gave him 30 years. Smith was obviously thinner than when we last saw him; still with his signature beard and fresh off a flight out of the capital Grand Turk where he was released. Magnetic Media was told that he is finished his time for the Turks and Caicos; and what is next for the man who once headed Olint, a company founded in Jamaica is unclear. In 2013, the US Department of Justice advised individuals who had invested with Smith that they could make claims for compensation. The report in the Jamaica Observer explains that a part of Smith’s criminal sentence was to forfeit assets seized by federal authorities. In 2011, David Smith was convicted in the US District Court for the Middle District of Florida on multiple counts of wire fraud and money laundering. Robert Di Pano, a NY, NJ and Florida attorney who writes frequently on financial crimes cases put the gravity of what David Smith, who is a TCI Belonger into perspective, saying and I quote: “Regardless of the outcome (in the Turks and Caicos), the severity of Smith’s US sentence looms large in the background.” David Smith back in court; continues to fight US Extraditionlast_img read more

Kenaitze Among Alaska Native Tribes Suing Drug Companies

first_imgThe complaint accuses drug manufacturers of marketing their products as safer and less addictive than they actually are, and accuses distributors of failing to halt suspicious orders and keep the drugs out of the black market. Among those is the Kenaitze Indian Tribe of the Kenai Peninsula. There are a total of five including; the Native Village of Afognak, the Native Village of Port Heiden, the Akiak Native Community and the Asa’carsarmiut Tribe of Mountain Village. The restitution amount the tribes are seeking has not been determined yet. According to the Complaint, “it’s created an Alaska Native community ravaged by painkiller addiction, overdose deaths, infant dependency, increased homelessness and rising suicide rates.”center_img Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享A group of Alaska Native Tribes has filed suit accusing drug manufacturers of marketing their products as safer and less addictive than they actually are. The list of defendants includes OxyContin and Percocet, as well as distributors and retailers like Walmart, Walgreens and Kroger.last_img read more

GOP Leaders to Discuss TwoYear Budget Deal with White House McConnell Says

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Republican leaders plan to enter budget discussions with the White House shortly to reach a deal over topline spending for fiscal 2016 and 2017, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told reporters Tuesday.“I hope that we in the fall negotiation can get some kind of an agreement on a top line for next year so we can finally, at long last, get back to acting on each appropriations bill separately,” McConnell said, reported CQ Roll Call. The Senate leader also revealed that he and House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) spoke with President Obama last week about launching budget talks.“I would expect them to start very soon,” McConnell said.An effort to reach a two-year budget deal would mirror the agreement reached in late 2013 that provided relief from the discretionary spending caps in FY 2014 and 2015 for defense and non-defense agencies.Meanwhile, the Senate is scheduled to vote this morning on a short-term continuing resolution that keeps the government open when the new fiscal year begins Thursday. The stopgap runs through Dec. 11 and does not strip Planned Parenthood of funding. After the Senate approves the CR, the House is expected to take it up before the end of the day to avert a federal shutdown.The House will only have a matter of hours to act before the midnight deadline, but House Republicans widely believe the chamber will pass the CR in time, according to CQ.Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) applauded the news that McConnell favors a two-year budget deal and stressed the need to combine negotiations over spending with an effort to extend the nation’s debt ceiling.“They have to be handled together. It’s the only way to intelligently do this,” Reid said.When asked about raising the debt ceiling before he steps down from his post at the end of October, Boehner on Tuesday did not rule it out. “We’ll have to see. There’s a number of issues we’re going to try to deal with in the coming month,” he told reporters.last_img read more

Wilmington Public Schools Receives 750000 Grant To Improve The Health Of Its Students

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington Public Schools recently received a substantial grant from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to expand its health services in an effort to improve student attendance and boost academic achievement.Wilmington was awarded a four-year Comprehensive School Health Services Grant at $75,000 annually. The grant comes with three, 2-year options to renew, meaning Wilmington excepts to receive $750,000 in funding.The grant process was competitive. Wilmington’s grant amount was based on student enrollment, community need, and the level of programming that schools committed to in their grant applications. Wilmington was one of 123 public school districts in the state to receive the grant.The grant writing committee recently appeared in front of the Wilmington School Committee to share the good news. The Committee consisted of Director of Nursing Services Doreen Crowe; Assistant Superintendent Brian Reagan; Coordinator of Behavioral Health & Social Emotional Support Christine Murray; Health & Physical Education Liaison Laura Stinson; Athletic Director Tim Alberts; ESL Director Susan MacDonald; and Middle School Nurse Janice Bacon.Crowe explained how the funding will positively impact health services to students in Wilmington.A part-time social worker (.4 FTE) will be hired at the high school to support its new Bridge Program, which assists students who have been absent from school for an extended period of time due to a health issue to successfully return to the classroom.A part-time care coordinator (.4 FTE) will be hired to help coordinating care to students with mental and physical health needs.In addition to program support and professional development, the district will use funds to improve and expand its health curriculum.As a result of the grant, Athletic Director Tim Alberts noted that health education will now be offered at the PreK and Kindergarten levels, and new nutrition education materials will be purchased at the elementary level.The district hopes these measures – and several others outlined – will help decrease chronic absenteeism and childhood obesity amongst its students, while increasing individualized health care plans and services to its students with mental and behavioral health conditions.“All the evidence points to the fact that children can’t learn if they are not healthy,” said Massachusetts Health and Human Services Secretary Marylou Sudders in a recent press release announcing the grant recipients. “This funding will support our efforts to keep students healthy, in school, and prepared to learn.”Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSCHOOL COMMITTEE To Discuss New School Year, New Administrators & New Goals At August 28 MeetingIn “Education”Wilmington Public Schools Receives $13,000 Grant To Combat Vaping At High School & Middle SchoolIn “Community”SCHOOL COMMITTEE NEWS: Homework, Bullying, Vaping, Grants, Gymnastics & More To Be Discussed At June 12 MeetingIn “Education”last_img read more

Subaru stops two Japanese factories to address powersteering defect

first_img 45 Photos 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 0 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Subaru Subaru: Stay up-to-date on everything Subaru.Subaru STI S209: Finally, Japanese forbidden fruit comes to the US. Subaru has discovered a defect in the power-steering systems of some of its Japanese-built vehicles, and has shut down the plants briefly as it investigates the root cause.On Wednesday Subaru announced that it had idled two plants in Japan’s Gunma prefecture on Jan. 16 when it discovered a defect that may disable a vehicle’s power steering and illuminate a warning lamp. According to the automaker’s press release, it hopes to have the plant up and running again on Jan. 28.The two plants comprise a majority of Subaru’s global manufacturing, including some models destined for the US. A Subaru spokesperson said approximately 10,000 examples of the Crosstrek and Forester might be affected, but the final number may be smaller.Enlarge ImageSubaru’s Japanese plants represent an overwhelming majority of its global sales, and the company isn’t sure how the shutdown will affect its bottom line in the short term. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images The spokesperson also stressed that no affected units have reached dealers or consumers, so there won’t be a need for a recall in the US. Any vehicles en route to retailers will receive a permanent fix before going on sale. This problem does not affect Subaru vehicles built in the US at its Indiana facility.In its press release, Subaru said it’s still working to determine the cause. A loss of power steering can make turning the wheel more difficult, especially at idle. Subaru Japan recommends that Japanese owners who experience this fault should stop driving and contact a dealer. In addition to affecting the Forester and Crosstrek (called the XV) in Japan, the problem also affects the Japanese-market Impreza.Subaru suffered a scandal in Japan in 2017 when it copped to decades of “flawed” vehicle inspections. Both Subaru and Nissan admitted to using unauthorized employees in quality-control jobs, in violation of Japanese regulations. Both automakers recalled vehicles for additional inspections following their admissions. More From Roadshow Roadshow’s long-term 2019 Subaru Ascent is a big, comfy family-hauler 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Post a comment Car Industry Crossovers Subaru Tags Share your voicelast_img read more

Cardinals Will Face Seton Hall in First True Road Game

first_imgThe Cardinals are very balanced on the offensive end, with four players averaging over nine points.  Sophomore Jordan Nwora leads the Cardinals in in scoring and rebounding with 17.7 points and 7.5 rebounds per game.  Ryan McMahon averages 10 points a game after scoring a career-high 24 points on Tuesday night.  Darius Perry ranks third on the team with 9.7 points per game, while shooting 50 percent from behind the line.  Steven Enoch rounds out the top scorers, averaging 9.2 points and 3.8 rebounds per game.  Louisville Game Notes Seton Hall Game Notes Live Stats Seton Hall, coached by former UofL assistant coach Kevin Willard, has had nearly a week off after winning the 2018 Wooden Legacy Championship, beating Miami 83-81 in the title game on Nov. 25 in Fullerton, Ca. Junior guard Myles Powell, the Pirates top scorer this season averaging 24.3 points per game (15th in the nation in scoring; 20-of-50 three-pointers), was named the Wooden Legacy’s Most Outstanding Player after averaging 25.3 points in three games in the event. All-tournament selection senior forwardMichael Nzei scored a career-high 21 points against Miami and averages 11.2 points while shooting 77.1 percent from the field (27-of-35). GAME 7Date: Dec. 1, 2018Time: NoonSite: Prudential Center (10,862), Newark, N.J.Television: FOX – Tim Brando, play-by-play; Jim Jackson, analyst; Andy Katz, reporter.Radio: WKRD (790 AM) Paul Rogers, play-by-play; Bob Valvano, analyst (XM channel 193, Internet 955)Series History: Louisville leads 13-6 (6-2 in Louisville, 6-4 at Seton Hall, 1-0 neutral)Last Meeting: Seton Hall 79, UofL 77 (Dec. 3, 2017 at KFC Yum! Center)Officials: Mike Roberts, Brent Hampton, Ron GrooverNext UofL Game: Dec. 5 vs. Central Arkansas, KFC Yum! Center, 7:00 p.m. ET (WAVE-TV in Louisville/Raycom Sports) Louisville plays its first true road game of the season as the Cardinals visit the Seton Hall Pirates on Saturday. Louisville posted its first victory over a Top 10 team in two years in beating No. 9/8 Michigan State 82-78 in overtime in the ACC-Big Ten Challenge at the KFC Yum! Center on Tuesday. Ryan McMahon scored a career-high 24 points off the bench, connecting on 4-of-7 three-pointers and 12-of-13 free throws as the Cardinals overcame a 17-rebound deficit. The Cardinals made 10 threes, their fourth game with eight or more. UofL has won 50 straight home games in the month of November spanning the last 28 years, including a perfect 37-0 record in the KFC Yum! Center. CARD FILES Louisville’s 2019 signing class is ranked as the best in the nation by ESPN.com, third by Rivals.com and fourth by 247sports.com. All six individuals are ranked highly among the nation’s prospects, including five of the six among ESPN’s top 100. The impressive signing class includes Aidan Igiehon, David Johnson, Josh Nickelberry, Quinn Slazinski, Samuell Williamson and Jae’Lyn Withers.Print Friendly Version Story Links Louisville has made 36 more free throws (163-of-213, .765) than its opponents have attempted (94-of-130, .723). Louisville leads the nation in free throw attempts per field goal attempts (213/325, 65.5 percent) and leads the nation with 31.8 percent of its points coming from free throws. The Cardinals made 30-of-41 free throws against Michigan State. UofL is 31st in the nation in free throw percentage. Nearly half of Louisville’s points this year have come from its bench (40.0 points per game). The Cardinals’ bench produced a school record 63 bench points against Southern and contributed 37 points against Michigan State. Jordan Nwora has scored in double digits in all six games this season, averaging 17.7 points per game (7th in the ACC). He produced 14 points and a team-high nine rebounds against Michigan State on Tuesday, his fifth game with seven or more rebounds. Louisville has scored over 80 points in five of its six games and the Cardinals are 30th in the nation in scoring offense, averaging 85.3 points per game. Louisville has a 37-7 record during the month of December over the last six years (6-2 in 2017-18). Louisville has a 13-6 series advantage over Seton Hall, winning five of the last six and 10 of the last 13 meetings. Seton Hall won the last matchup 79-77 over the Cardinals in the KFC Yum! Center last year (12-3-17) as Desi Rodriguez scored 29 points for the Pirates, including the winning basket with eight seconds remaining.last_img read more

Death of spouse ups irregular heartbeat risk

first_imgThe death of a spouse is linked to increased risk of developing an irregular heartbeat up to a year after the bereavement, says a study adding that the risk is prevalent among those below 60.The condition known as atrial fibrillation — itself a risk factor for stroke and heart failure — can also flare up in cases when the loss was least expected.According to Danish researchers, acute stress may directly disrupt normal heart rhythms and prompt the production of chemicals involved in inflammation. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“The elevated risk was especially high for those who were young and those who lost a relatively healthy partner,” said Simon Graff of Aarhus University in Denmark. The team collected information on 88,612 people newly diagnosed with atrial fibrillation and 886,120 healthy people.They looked at several factors that might influence atrial fibrillation risk which included time since the bereavement, age and sex, heart disease and diabetes, the health of the partner a month before death, and whether they were single. The results, published in the online journal Open Heart, indicated that the risk of developing an irregular heartbeat was 41 per cent higher among those who had been bereaved than it was among those who had not experienced such a loss. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe risk seemed to be greater during eight to 14 days following a death, after which it gradually subsided until after a year the risk was similar to that of someone who had not been bereaved.The highest risk was seen among people under the age of 60: they were more than twice as likely to develop atrial fibrillation if they had been bereaved and the risk also seemed to be greater where the partner’s death had been unexpected.Those whose partners were relatively healthy in the month before death, were 57 per cent more likely to develop atrial fibrillation.last_img read more

Agents can win Beats headphones when selling from Trafalgars AWS brochure

first_img Share Tags: Agent Incentives, Brochures, Contests, Trafalgar TORONTO — After breaking down the numbers of Trafalgar’s new 2017-18 Autumn, Winter & Spring (AWS) brochure, you get 34 itineraries, 26 European countries, two new trips, and $150 in early booking savings.The new brochure highlights everything from traditional Christmas Markets and alpine peaks to Tuscan wines and Parisian farmers’ markets. New this year are the nine-day ‘Delights of London and Paris’ and the seven-day ‘Festive St Petersburg and Moscow’ itinerary.In addition to these two new itineraries, Trafalgar has made its 15-day tailored ‘European White Christmas Delights & New Year Lights’ trip available to Canadian travellers for the first time ever. While on this tour, clients will learn about champagne production, experience a white Christmas in St. Moritz and ring in the New Year in Tuscany.To entice clients to book early, Trafalgar is offering 7.5% off 2017-18 AWS Europe vacations when paid in full by Aug. 31, 2017, plus $150 per couple on air booked and paid in full from May 5-June 15, 2017.More news:  AMResorts has a new Sr. Dir. of Cdn. Sales & Consortia Rel’nsAgents also have a chance to win one of four pairs of Beats by Dr. Dre headphones. Agents can enter by signing up for Trafalgar’s agent newsletter, by selling from the AWS brochure from now until June 30, 2017, and by sharing travel moments and including a #SimplyAWS hashtag. This contest is running now and will end on June 30.“There really is no better place in the world to experience different seasons than Europe, and we’ve made it easy for clients to discover the festive flavours and allure of some of our favourite destinations with authentic experiences and moments of magic,” says Wolf Paunic, president of Trafalgar Canada. “We also want to help our loyal agents sell effortlessly this season and top up their 2017 bookings while giving clients amazing value holiday experiences.” Travelweek Group Agents can win Beats headphones when selling from Trafalgar’s AWS brochurecenter_img Posted by Tuesday, May 30, 2017 << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

Irma recovery Florida Keys will open to visitors Oct 1

first_imgTags: Florida, Hurricane Irma Source: The Associated Press KEY WEST, FLORIDA — Florida Keys officials say the island chain hit hard by Hurricane Irma will reopen to tourists Oct. 1.Officials made their announcement Monday, more than two weeks after the Category 4 storm made landfall in the Florida Keys. The storm destroyed an estimated 25 per cent of homes on the islands.Florida Keys officials asked visitors to postpone their trips after the storm damaged power and water supplies. Florida Keys spokesman Andy Newman said power and water service is now restored to customers that can receive them and a boil water notice has been lifted.The Key West and Marathon airports have reopened, but debris removal continues and some hotels and tourist facilities are still recovering.Key West did have its first cruise ship return to the island on Sunday. << Previous PostNext Post >> Tuesday, September 26, 2017 Share Irma recovery: Florida Keys will open to visitors Oct. 1last_img read more

September 2 2016The Living Theatre visited Arcosa

first_imgSeptember 2, 2016The Living Theatre visited Arcosanti on Monday to perform one of their most significant pieces -“Seven Meditations on Political Sado-Masochism” – which has been described as a “visceral examination of the social contract between the governed and the government”. The Theatre arrived at 3 pm to perform a matinee in the North Vault before continuing on their national tour.[photo by planning intern Victor dos Santos, text by Sean-Paul VonAncken]The Arcosanti audience knew that the themes would be somber and hard-hitting, but nothing could quite prepare us for the earnest delivery, emotional precision, and unwavering authority of a truly relevant and revolutionary performance.[photo by Sue Kirsch]Seven Meditations awakens our civic senses, orienting us in relation to our oppressive governing structures and economy of alienation. It frames the human condition, confronting themes of violence, slavery (both ancient and contemporary), property, warfare, police brutality, and death in a 21st century context.[photo by Sue Kirsch]The piece was both activating and provocative. In the end, the group – bound in chains and in agonizing pain – asks how their pain can be remedied, how their chains can be removed, and how their minds can become truly free.[photo by Sue Kirsch]As an audience we rose to the occasion, jumping to the aid of the actors and embracing them, helping our fellow men and women to their feet. As a whole group we made a circle in the vaults and concluded with a powerful hymn.[photo by Sue Kirsch]We send out a huge thank you to the living theatre and wish them well along their tour. It was an honor to host their sentiments of revolution, awareness, and hope.[photo by Victor dos Santos]It is rare to witness a performance that confronts our most deeply embedded socio-economic concerns with such poignancy and realism.[photo by Sue Kirsch]last_img read more

Michigan House approves urgent funding for Macomb County sinkhole

first_img The Michigan House today overwhelmingly approved a funding bill urgently needed to address health and safety issues related to the Macomb County sinkhole emergency.The bill approved with bipartisan support includes $3 million from the state to help protect people, property and the environment from potential sewage overflows as crews continue to address the sinkhole that developed in late December. A state of emergency continues in the area.“Time is of the essence when it comes to the sinkhole emergency,” said Rep. Jeff Yaroch, R-Richmond, who sponsored the funding bill approved by the House. “We have to act now to protect public safety and health. If we have another heavy rain, we can’t afford to have raw sewage backing up into our residents’ homes and polluting the Clinton River, Lake St. Clair and beyond. Our Great Lakes are too important to not just Macomb County, but the entire Great Lakes region, so we can’t afford any delays in this project.”Republicans and Democrats joined forces to support the bill with a sense of urgency. The House Appropriations Committee approved the measure earlier in the day.“Hard-working families have enough to worry about without adding sinkholes and infrastructure problems to the list,” said Rep. Patrick Green, D-Warren. “I’m grateful that the state Legislature is moving quickly to repair the sinkhole in Macomb County and to take steps to make sure this won’t happen again.”“I am pleased to see Macomb County receive additional funding to deal with the sinkhole disaster,” said state Rep. Kevin Hertel, D-St. Clair Shores. “This tells homeowners and businesses that we are focused on doing all we can to help with these massive infrastructure repairs.”The money approved by the House would go toward building a long-term bypass around the sewer collapse that started the sinkhole. The project is needed to prevent sewage from backing up into homes and waterways.“We need to make sure we do what we can to protect people in our communities, as well as the environment and our precious natural resources,” said Rep. Diana Farrington, R-Utica. “This funding is an essential part of that effort.”Legislators praised the bipartisan support and quick action.“I am glad to be a part of this effort to continue helping our Macomb County communities affected by this sinkhole disaster,” said state Rep. Henry Yanez, D-Sterling Heights. “Acting now to send additional help will prevent the situation from worsening.”The Macomb County sinkhole started along 15 Mile Road in Fraser, but its effects have spread across the region.“The impact is broad and devastating,” said Rep. Steve Marino, R-Harrison Township. “This disaster affects more than 500,000 people, nearly a dozen communities and Selfridge Air National Guard Base. These residents need and deserve our help, and the Legislature must deliver that help.”Rep. Bill Sowerby, D-Clinton Township, echoed those sentiments.“Many residents and businesses of my district are severely impacted, along with several families having lost their homes, due to this infrastructure collapse,” Sowerby said. “I am pleased to join my Macomb County colleagues and vote for this additional money to help with the infrastructure repairs.”Many local communities remain urged to limit water usage to avoid strain on the system.“Due to the urgency of this situation, we need to move swiftly to approve this legislation to clear the financial obstacles Macomb is facing,” said Rep. Pamela Hornberger, R-Chesterfield Township.Rep. Peter Lucido, R-Shelby Township, agreed.“You can’t see sewer pipes. You can’t see water pipes. But they need to be kept in good repair, just like the roads and bridges we see every day do,” Lucido said. “I’m proud to stand with my colleagues in support of this help for Macomb County.”Said Rep. John Chirkun, D-Roseville: “I’ve heard from many constituents who are concerned about the state of our infrastructure since the sinkhole opened up, and I’m glad that I’ll be able to tell them that the state is taking action to address the problem. Moving forward, I will work to see our state invest in maintaining and updating our infrastructure to prevent another sinkhole opening up here or anywhere else in Michigan.”The bill approved today by the House now goes to the Senate for consideration. Categories: Yaroch News 22Mar Michigan House approves urgent funding for Macomb County sinkholelast_img read more

Carl Icahn Billionaire investor and Apple sharehol

first_imgCarl IcahnBillionaire investor and Apple shareholder, Carl Icahn, said he expects the firm to make a “more dramatic push” into the TV market next year. In an open letter, addressed to Apple CEO Tim Cook, Icahn said he believes TV’s role in the living room is a “strategically compelling bolt-on to the Apple ecosystem” and predicted the launch of a much-rumoured Apple branded TV set.“In addition to an Ultra High Definition television set, we expect Apple to launch a related suite of tiered products and services, including a ‘skinny bundle’ of pay TV channels (partnered with various media companies) and an updated Apple TV microconsole (which will continue to service the massive install base of televisions offered by other OEMs),” said Icahn in the letter, which was co-signed by son Brett Icahn and business partner David Schechter.“This will enable Apple to pursue the entire market by offering multiple products at various price points across the demographic spectrum.  Netflix offers a similar tiered approach to pricing today by charging a higher price for those seeking the ability to receive ultra high definition content.”Icahn said that a larger move into TV would benefit Apple’s other devices and services – suggesting that the recently launched Apple watch could be use as a remote control.“Similarly, as we expect Apple to launch a larger 12.9” iPad, it would offer an enhanced viewing experience for an Apple pay TV service, or act an improved “second screen” to an Apple UltraHD television,” said Icahn.Outlining the opportunities in the TV space, he claimed that people spent an average 25% of their free time watching TV and that excluding advertising, the addressable market for TV is roughly US$575 billion – “which is larger than the smartphone market.”According to previous reports, Apple is planning to launch a revamped version of its Apple TV set-top box in June, along with a new version of its App Store and a software development kit optimised for the device.It is also reported to be planning to launch an online TV service this autumn in partnership with broadcasters including ABC, CBS and Fox.However, the Wall Street Journal reported yesterday that Apple’s long-rumoured TV set plans were “quietly shelved” more than a year ago after almost a decade of research. Crediting people familiar with the matter, the WSJ reported that Apple did not consider features that it was looking at “compelling enough to enter the highly competitive television market.”Carl Icahn is currently ranked 31 on the Forbes rich list, with an estimated worth of US$22.4 billion.last_img read more

Channel 4s digital service All4 is launching su

first_imgChannel 4’s digital service, All4, is launching support for 360° video ads from this week.The UK broadcaster’s 4Sales division announced the new Ad 360 format today, and Honda and South African Tourism will be the first brands to use the 360° interactive VOD ads.“Ad 360 enables All 4’s audience to engage with brands in a new and exciting way using the latest developments in 360 degree content creation, strengthening our existing suite of innovative digital ad products,” said Channel 4’s digital and creative leader, David Amodio.The Ad 360 format was developed by video technology partners Innovid, and the firm claims that together with Channel 4 it is bringing “360° interactive video experiences to the European market for the first time.”last_img read more

Natural TV a Turkish channel focused on health a

first_imgNatural TV, a Turkish channel focused on health, agriculture, music and cultural content, is extending its reach to the West-African region.The channel has struck a new agreement announced with SES to use capacity on SES’s Astra 2G satellite as well as uplink services from its teleport in Betzdorf, Luxembourg.With a potential audience of five million TV homes in West Africa, the free-to-air channel, broadcast in English, will feature original content from Turkey.SES has established a strong presence in West Africa, predominantly in Ghana and Nigeria, where it reaches two million and 2.81 million TV homes respectively. Astra 2G, launched in 2014, is one of SES’s satellites covering the region from the prime orbital location of 28.2 degrees East.“We are delighted to carry the only private Turkish TV channel available to West-African viewers. Not only do we provide our broadcasting services, but we will also support Natural TV with our local presence and our involvement in TV platforms in Ghana and Nigeria,” said Daniel Cop, General Manager, Sales Nordic, Baltic and Eastern Europe, at SES Video.“We certainly expect Natural TV to bring a new look to the West-African broadcast schedule with original Turkish-made broadcast content,” said Tuncay Demir, General Manager, at Natural TV. “Starting as a free-to-air channel, we think Natural TV will soon find its audience and raise interest from local TV platforms.”last_img read more

Pupils from Holy Family Primary School performing

first_img Pupils from Holy Family Primary School performing at the launch of the second City of Derry International Choral Festival.Communities across Derry will be alive with the sound of singing next week, as part of the second City of Derry International Choral Festival. From shopping centres to care homes, churches to bingo halls, choirs will be popping up all over the city to give free, informal performances during the five-day event which begins on Wednesday next, 22 October.It’s all part of the festival’s ambitious community and outreach programme, developed in partnership with the Neighbourhood Renewal Areas community engagement team. “We’re also thrilled that choirs will be part of the Unity sculpture lighting ceremony in Galliagh.”There are three strands to the community programme.The Choral Trail on Saturday, 25 October, will see pop up events in shopping centres, including Ráth Mór, Sainsbury’s, Northside and Springtown, while on Friday 24th October, choirs will visit Ardnashee School and College, House in the Wells alcohol recovery centre and St Joseph’s Parish Centre Bingo night.On Sunday, 26 October, the Sacred Trail will see visiting international choirs sing during Sunday service in eight churches around the city, including St Columb’s and St Eugene’s Cathedrals.Later that day, there will be a free concert at St Columb’s Park House at 1.00pm, while at 4.00pm in Galliagh, choirs will celebrate the official lighting of the Unity sculpture.All events are free. For more information visit www.codichoral.comCOMMUNITIES TO TAKE CENTRE STAGE AT CHORAL FESTIVAL was last modified: October 17th, 2014 by stephenstephen Tags: choralcitycommunitiesDerryfestival In total there will be twenty events, including a free concert at St Columb’s Park House on Sunday 26th October, a performance at the lighting ceremony of the Unity Sculpture in Galliagh, a number of churches hosting visiting choirs and a range of pop up events in public places.As well as visiting international choirs, local new choirs will be given a platform, including Something Special, First Source’s Inspire choir and community choir Songlines.Helen Sayers, Community Engagement Co-ordinator at Greater Shantallow Area Partnership, her team has been working in partnership with the Choral Festival team to bring the “joy and energy” of choral music to new audiences across the city.She added: “We’re particularly excited by the free concert at St Columb’s Park House where a visiting choir from Slovenia and Cór Chairlinne from Louth will share the stage with the newly formed community choir Songlines. ShareTweetlast_img read more

Dr ODea has a track record of creating strong w

first_imgDr. O’Dea has a track record of creating strong, well-financed companies built on high-quality projects and run by technical leaders. As President, Chief Executive Officer and Director of Fronteer Gold (2001 to 2011), Dr. O’Dea grew the company from a $2-million start-up into a well-funded, high-profile, development-focused gold company acquired in 2011 by Newmont Mining Corp. for $2.3 billion. Over the past decade, Dr. O’Dea has raised more than $750 million through equity financings, equity investments and asset divestitures, providing strong returns to his shareholders and bringing financial strength and stability to his companies. Importantly, Dr. O’Dea and his team have a proven track record of discovery, having been integral in advancing and/or discovering five large gold and gold/copper deposits located in Nevada and Turkey and two world-class uranium deposits in Labrador. Dr. O’Dea is the Founder of Oxygen Capital Corp. and plays leadership roles in all Oxygen companies. He is the Founder and Chair of Pilot Gold, Executive Chair of Riverstone Resources,  and Founder and co-Chair of True North Nickel.  He was also Founder and CEO of Blue Gold Mining, which merged with Riverstone Resources in December 2012.last_img read more

first_img— For the first time ever: a guided tour of Doug’s Ranch in UruguayDoug Casey was kind enough to take our cameras on a guided tour of beautiful Uruguayan Estancia. We even captured Doug showing off a few special pieces in his art collection. Click here for a rare look inside the private life of one of the world’s most reclusive millionaires. Recommended Link Justin’s note: At Casey Research, we’re always looking to pass along smart ways for you to make money. My colleague Nick Rokke, analyst for The Palm Beach Daily, is one of the brightest guys I know. And he recently wrote about one such way.It’s a historic opportunity for you to add some quality companies to your portfolio… By Nick Rokke, analyst, The Palm Beach DailyEarlier this month, Apple announced the largest stock buyback in history.During its May 1 earnings call, Apple said it would buy back $100 billion worth of shares. That’s about 12% of the company.Not surprisingly, shares of the iPhone maker reached an all-time high.In October 2017, Palm Beach Letter editor Teeka Tiwari told me that President Trump’s tax cuts would boost the fortunes of companies like Apple… and therefore, that of their shareholders.Here’s what Teeka said then:Apple was one of the biggest benefiters of the last tax repatriation holiday (in 2004).Today, Apple has $230 billion in foreign cash. Based on history, we expect Apple to repatriate 90% of that cash, or $207 billion…And if it goes through, shareholders will be the No. 1 beneficiary.Since Teeka added Apple to The Palm Beach Letter portfolio in August 2017, it’s up nearly 21%. (Apple is above his buy-up-to price, so we don’t recommend buying it now.) Here’s the thing…Apple isn’t the only company buying back shares. So far in 2018, companies have announced over $400 billion in new buybacks. Some analysts predict there will be over $800 billion in buybacks this year.This is giving us a historic opportunity to add some quality companies to our portfolios.Before I get to the companies, let me tell you what’s going on.Tax Cuts = More Money for ShareholdersThese large buybacks aren’t happening just because companies are doing well. They’re getting a boost from the tax cuts that President Trump signed into law last year.As Teeka told Palm Beach Letter subscribers last year, the most important line in the tax law was this: “One-time tax on trillions of dollars held overseas.”Here’s why that line is important…President Trump’s new law would drop the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%.So any company that had an effective tax rate of 35% in 2017 would be able to hang onto an additional 14% of its profits in 2018. How Doug Casey Turned $1,875 Into $1.2 Million, With One Bold Move Back in ’93, Doug Casey took a $1,875 stake of money, then made one bold move. Exactly two and a half years later, his stake was worth $1.2 million – a rare and extraordinary 64,000% return. To see how he did it, click here. Recommended Link — Any time a company keeps more of its money, that’s good thing for stock prices.But the tax law had another benefit for corporations… They can “repatriate” money held offshore for a one-time, low rate of 15.5%.Teeka predicted that corporations would repatriate up to $2.6 trillion in overseas cash… and return that extra cash to shareholders via increased dividends and buybacks.We’re already seeing that with Apple.Investors loved hearing that Apple was buying back $100 billion worth of its shares. That’s why the stock shot up so much.But as I said, Apple isn’t the only “tax refund” company buying back bucketloads of stock.Where to Find “Tax Refund” CompaniesCompanies have announced almost a half-trillion dollars’ worth of buybacks in 2018.Ironically, to discredit the tax cuts, Senate Democrats have put together a list of companies that will buy back the most shares. They call it the “GOP Tax Scam.”(Democrats believe Trump’s tax cuts benefited wealthy shareholders over the middle class. One senator even wrote a bill to prohibit companies from buying back shares, which is ridiculous.)Nevertheless, we steer clear of political fights in the Daily. Our goal is to find you money-making opportunities. And in this case, the Democrats have made our job easier by compiling a list of companies buying back stock.There are a few companies I like on the list, including former Elite 25 company AbbVie, as well as Facebook, Google, and Visa.For the complete list, click here.Now, we haven’t researched every company on this list. And just because a company buys back shares, doesn’t make it a good investment.Sometimes the timing just isn’t right. (For instance, we had to sell two of our “tax refund” stocks for small losses.)So make sure you do your due diligence.But when a company buys back its shares, it’s a good thing. In fact, I’d use this list as a starting point for my investment research.Regards,Nick Rokke, CFA Analyst, The Palm Beach DailyP.S. As I mentioned above, some companies will be major winners from President Trump’s tax plan. And we’ve found five “all-star” companies that we think will benefit the most. To access this report, you need a subscription to The Palm Beach Letter. To learn how to become a subscriber, and about our other income-generating ideas, please click here.In Case You Missed It…There’s a tiny clause buried in the new tax bill that’s gone completely unnoticed by the mainstream media…It has nothing to do with income taxes, estate taxes, or special deductions.In fact, this section of the tax bill—located on page 553—has been completely overlooked by accountants… even though it creates a potential $460 billion windfall for everyday Americans. Click here to get all the details…last_img read more

Rural hospitals close when they dont have enough

first_imgRural hospitals close when they don’t have enough paying patients to care for, but they’re also dinged when the same patients show up over and over again. That puts outlying medical facilities in the precarious position of needing to avoid repeat customers.Charlotte Potts is the type of patient some hospitals try to avoid. She lives in Livingston, Tenn. — a town of 4,000, tucked between rolling hills of the Cumberland Plateau.”I’ve only had five heart attacks,” Potts says with a laugh. “I’ve had carotid artery surgery. Shall we go on? Just a few minor things.” She jokes that she’s “a walking stent.”The heart trouble has affected the way Potts deals with her health problems. She spends much of her day in a recliner in her apartment, tethered to a pulsing oxygen machine, and listening to the radio.Fortunately, her apartment sits within spitting distance of Livingston Regional Hospital — a 114-bed facility large enough to have a dedicated cardiac unit. But the hospital doesn’t want to see her every time her heart flutters.So last time she landed in the ER, they helped her connect with a few companies that could provide care at home.”If I’m going to have certain things going on here in my chest, I call for help, and they’re there,” Potts says of the home care team she chose.A new era in hospital managementThere were days when the hospital might have viewed a home health agency as a competitor. Not anymore.”When I started this almost 40 years ago, the mission was different,” says Tim McGill, CEO of Livingston Regional. “We wanted patients in the hospital. That was the incentive. We were paid for it. Now you’re not.”Hospitals used to run on a so-called fee-for-service model with virtually no limit to how many times they could see a patient. But, under pressure from private and government insurance programs, that model is transitioning to one in which hospitals are rewarded for safety and efficiency — which often results in a patient spending less time in the hospital.Under the Affordable Care Act, Medicare began to ding hospitals if too many patients are readmitted to any hospital within 30 days of discharge. The measure is broadly unpopular with the hospital industry, since so much falls outside a hospital’s control. Medicare has even walked back the rules for safety-net facilities, which tend to treat a sicker population.The penalty is meant to encourage hospitals to get it right the first time. In Livingston, the hospital operates on the thinnest of margins — just 0.2 percent in the most recent figures. And “readmissions” have been a drag on the bottom line.One in five patients with heart failure was back within the month. The hospital has paid the maximum penalty in some years — nearly $200,000. So leaders started asking a basic, unifying question of other providers in town, McGill says: “What can we do together so they’ll stay out of the hospital and stay healthier in their home setting? That’s where the work is.”Collaborating instead of competingThe work took the form of quarterly lunch meetings at the local library.Mary Ann Stockton, a nurse at the hospital, invites all the home health agencies as well as hospice providers and the leaders of nursing homes.At one meeting, she applauds the other providers for increasingly meeting patients inside the hospital before they’re discharged. She says it helps patients and families accept these home health workers.”We know in our area, people don’t like to have a total stranger come into their home,” she says.The group brainstorms how to generate the same kind of acceptance for hospice care, which — as one doctor in the meeting puts it — some families view as assisted suicide.And on this day, the groups spends much of its time reviewing the value of flu shots, especially for the staff in nursing homes. Stockton says elderly patients with bad lungs become a hospital emergency room’s “frequent fliers.””Flu starts off, goes into pneumonia, COPD exacerbation — and they are a revolving door in our hospital,” Stockton says. “They’re hitting that ER a couple of times a week.”Advance directives are on the agenda for next time — another way to keep people near the end of life from becoming ER regulars.Livingston’s parent company, LifePoint Health, is launching this community approach in many of its 80-or-so markets, which are primarily in the Southeast and almost all rural. LifePoint vice president Cindy Chamness helps hospitals find willing partners.”We were very frustrated for many years,” Chamness says, “because we weren’t able to impact readmissions just working on it by ourselves, as a hospital.””Are we saving ourselves right out of business?”The solution looks different from one town to another. In Lake Havasu, Ariz., paramedics now visit discharged patients to make sure they’re following doctors’ orders. The house calls also cut down on government-funded ambulance rides.It’s not just rural hospitals — all hospitals can be penalized for readmissions now. And threatening the bottom line in that way does seem to be effective. Readmissions have been falling across the board, according to the latest research.But rural hospitals, which already treat fewer patients than urban hospitals, wonder if they’ll have enough patients to survive, says Michael Topchik of the Chartis Center for Rural Health.”[A] CEO from Montana said to me, ‘The problem is, when we do the right thing, are we saving ourselves right out of business?’ ” says Michael Topchik of the Chartis Center for Rural Health.The focus on cutting readmissions — by definition — cuts overall admissions too, he notes.”So, this is the real inherent tension and challenge: Hospitals get reimbursed for doing ‘sick care,’ ” Topchik says. “But more and more they’re being asked to do population health, and really focus on ‘wellness.’ “To make up the volume, the Livingston hospital is expanding its maternity ward and general surgery offerings.There is also some immediate financial upside to reducing readmissions: Livingston Regional has cut readmissions more than any other rural hospital in Tennessee and even the nation, according to data compiled by Chartis.As a result, the hospital’s Medicare penalty in the coming year will be reduced to 0.3 percent of its reimbursements — down from the maximum of 3 percent, which was roughly $200,000 a year.That’s all because patients like Charlotte Potts now can safely stay home.”I got a real bad tightness in the chest,” Potts recalls about a recent episode. She’d questioned whether to call an ambulance. “I was very uncertain about what was going on.”But she phoned her home health agency, took a nitroglycerin pill as the agency advised, and instead of going to the ER, was able to get back to sleep. Copyright 2018 Nashville Public Radio. To see more, visit Nashville Public Radio.last_img read more

Human rights campaigners have criticised plans for

first_imgHuman rights campaigners have criticised plans for an inquiry that will examine lessons from the deaths of people in mental distress in police custody, because they say the government already knows what action it needs to take.The call came from Black Mental Health UK (BMH UK), which has repeatedly raised concerns about the number of mental health service-users from the UK’s African-Caribbean community who have died in police custody, and has particularly criticised the dangerous and often fatal use of restraint on people with mental illness.The independent review of deaths and serious incidents in custody was announced in a speech in south London today (Thursday) by home secretary Theresa May.It will examine procedures and processes surrounding deaths and serious incidents in police custody, including the availability and effectiveness of mental healthcare facilities, the use of restraint and the training of officers.It will also “identify areas for improvement and develop recommendations to ensure appropriate, humane institutional treatment when such incidents occur”.But it will not reopen and reinvestigate past cases and will not “interfere” with ongoing inquests, investigations or Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) reviews.Matilda MacAttram, BMH UK’s director, said: “What is another inquiry going to do? They know the problems already.“The recommendations have been made in the hundreds. How many more recommendations do we need?”She added: “There is a sense of inquiry fatigue among many in Britain’s black communities as we have seen a raft of  inquiries with supposedly ‘hard hitting’ recommendations after almost every high-profile death of a black man in custody for the past 40 years – but nothing has changed.“What we need to see is justice, and what that looks like is ending the practice of using lethal levels of force with no accountability – do we need another inquiry to tell us that?”She said there were clear problems already identified within the criminal justice and mental health systems, such as police officers – often in riot gear – routinely entering psychiatric wards to restrain patients.And she pointed to a string of inquiries into the use of restraint that have been carried out by the police, the Department of Health, and the IPCC.She said the authorities had been “looking into it” for the last four decades, and that she would rather funding be spent providing community-based places of safety, crisis care or talking therapies.MacAttram said: “The people at the top know how the system works. An inquiry is like kicking something into the long grass for 12 months.”She said there were key measures the government could take instead of holding another inquiry.One is to ensure that the £15 million funding announced before the election to provide new health-based places of safety – to ensure people in mental distress are not kept in police custody – should be ring-fenced, or given direct to charities to resource community-based places of safety.MacAttram believes the new funding will otherwise disappear into the black hole of over-stretched local health budgets.She said: “Right now every provider has a health-based place of safety, but they are not staffed.”Another measure that could be taken is to outlaw the use of police officers on mental health wards, and instead to resource mental health services properly.And every time police officers are called onto a mental health ward, there should be an investigation by the IPCC, she said.Meanwhile, new IPCC figures show the number of deaths in or following police custody in England and Wales rose from 11 to 17 in 2014-15. Eight of the 17 people who died had mental health problems.There were also 69 apparent suicides following police custody, a fall of just one on 2013-14, but an increase of 30 since 2011-12.These figures – released on the same day as May’s speech – do not include deaths where police were called in to help medical staff to restrain individuals who were not under arrest.IPCC chair Dame Anne Owers said that IPCC investigations into deaths in or following police custody “have too often exposed the same issues”, such as inadequate risk assessments; token checks on a person in custody; insufficient handovers between custody staff; and a failure to recognise or properly deal with people with mental health concerns.last_img read more