Tony Becca | Land of my birth, I pledge to thee

first_img The good players always came back, however, and they came back through players like Michael Holding, Jeffrey Dujon, Courtney Walsh, Patrick Patterson, James Adams, Gordon Greenidge, Desmond Haynes, Fidel Edwards, Carl Hooper, Shivnarine Chanderpaul, Ramnaresh Sarwan, Brian Lara, Ian Bishop, Richie Richardson and Curtley Ambrose, and many more before them. The West Indian islands have always produced good players, and the players always, or most times, won titles. When Jamaica take to the field in March in their bid for the regional title, they will do so without some of their top players, without Gayle, Samuels, and Russell, and they will do so definitely without Nkrumah Bonner and Sheldon Cottrell. Win or lose, it will not be the same to me. I am a West Indian, and I love West Indies cricket. But I am a Jamaican-West Indian. Jamaica is the land of my birth. As Chris Gayle said recently, however, and apparently quite easily and with a smile on his face, “This is franchise cricket,” the four words that cover up everything else, some quite understandable (family), some understandable (money), and some not so understandable (money, and more money). In today’s world, in the mad rush for money, and more money, the four words, “this is franchise cricket”, trump loyalty, and sacrifice (even for those who would not any longer have to make the sacrifice). The cricketers go wherever they want to go, so, too, do the nurses, the teachers, and whoever wants to do so, and thank God, they are free so to do. To Carlos Brathwaite, however, for his commitment to Barbados and West Indies cricket, for leaving the Sydney Thunder and the Australian Big Bash and for deciding to play, after his brilliant last-minute blast of four consecutive sixes, carried the West Indies to victory in last year’s ICC World T20 Championship and pushed him to the top of the world’s “most wanted” list, for Barbados and the West Indies in the region’s Super50 tournament, well done and good luck. That’s a good example, a perfect example, and one that brings new hope for West Indies cricket. Some may say that sport today is business, and that it is just a part of modern-day business. That may be so. In the West Indies, however, in West Indies cricket, the franchise system must be different, and it must be different if only for reason. The franchise is used for club-to-club transactions and not for country-to-country transactions. In other words, it is used at the level below international representation, thus making it a good system for countries like England, Australia, India, and South Africa, for countries like the USA, Jamaica, and Barbados, and places like that. The West Indies, however, and West Indies cricket, therefore, are unique. The West Indies is made up of 12 sovereign countries, 12 independent countries, and of countries with their own governments, their own constitutions, their own money, their own national anthems, and their own flags, etcetera. And not one of these governments, at least not to my knowledge, has given anyone the authority to fiddle with the constitution of their country by making a citizen of another country a citizen of their country for the purposes of cricket. Neither have they given them the authority to sell off one of their players to another country, and only for cricket at that. Once upon a time, when the West Indies were the best in the world at cricket, their cricketers all played for their respective countries, and they played well. The competition was good, and those countries which were not so good tried to develop themselves until they themselves became good. Those days, the players were good, and the countries won and lost matches and tournaments. When they won tournaments, the countries celebrated, and when they lost, the countries looked around, built again, and tried to come again. Those who proposed and passed the franchise system, West Indian-style, probably have never heard the song, “Land of my birth, I pledge to thee, loyal and faithful, strong and free”. If they had, they probably would not have suggested it, much less forced it on the people of the West Indies. As good as the franchise system sometimes can be, it is not good for the West Indies, and especially not for those Jamaicans who are touched by the words, “This is my Jamaica, my Jamaica”, or for those, even though they are West Indians also, who are influenced by the words of another song, “I vow to thee my country”. The franchise system is a system used in sports, along with the name of a club or a community, to make money, and as much money as possible. It is hardly ever used to lift the standard of sport. Its main intention is not to improve sport by switching players around, from club to club, or from community to community, but rather to haul in money through the sale of players in an effort to win trophies, or simply to field a good, competitive team for the satisfaction of winning and to make more money. It is a simple matter. If I cannot produce a good player, I can go and buy one, and if I am not satisfied, I can go out and buy another. It is much easier than attempting to produce a good player. It is easier, and much cheaper, to find a good scout, or a not so good scout, to find a player. The franchise system is a money system, even though it has left many a club, even the biggest of them, deep in debt and living close to the bank despite the appearance of affluence. The clubs, particularly the European football clubs, are becoming more and more, and day by day, properties of American, Chinese, and Russian billionaires. GOOD PLAYERS COME BACK MODERN-DAY BUSINESSlast_img read more

Bluestack Foundation gets €36,000 interim funding

first_imgDeputy Pat the Cope Gallagher Leas Cheann Comhairle has welcomed the decision to approve interim funding of €36,000 for the Bluestack Foundation in Donegal Town.This funding measure which will assist in the running of the organisation in the coming months.The Bluestack Foundation carries out trojan work in assisting young people with disabilities in south and west Donegal and the organisation thus far has been run totally on voluntary contributions from the general public organised by a group of volunteers. Deputy Galagher said “Earlier this year we were all absolutely shocked when the Government failed to include the Foundation in the Ability Programme, which when announced failed to include any disability organisation in the Northwest of Ireland.”He added that today’s announcement will in some way ease the incredible disappointment of the failure to include the Bluestack Foundation in the Ability Programme.However, this interim measure cannot be a substitute for the need for mainstream funding for this group.“The Bluestack Foundation on its own merits deserves to be in receipt of mainstream annual funding such as can be availed of through the Ability Programme, the Bluestack Foundation has a long history of helping and assisting young people with disabilities,” he added “I personally challenged An Taoiseach Leo Varadkar on this very issue in the Dáil, and I further wrote to him with a map highlighting the regional imbalance as a result of the decision taken by his Government.“It is only through this degree of political pressure has the Government through the HSE reacted and allocated this interim funding, but I can assure the Bluestack Foundation that this is not the end of the campaign and until they are in receipt of permanent funding I for one will not rest,” concluded Pat the Cope.Bluestack Foundation gets €36,000 interim funding was last modified: July 29th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Windows Digital Rights Update Tool removes WMA DRM protection

first_imgWindows Digital Rights Update Tool removes WMA DRM protection by Martin Brinkmann on April 24, 2017 in Software – 12 commentsDigital Rights Update Tool is a new application for Windows 10 by Microsoft that allows you to remove DRM protection from WMA audio files.Windows users who use Windows Media Player to rip audio CDs to WMA audio files on devices running Windows may notice one day that DRM protection was added to the audio files.The same may be true for WMA songs or albums acquired on the Internet, as they make use of DRM as well usually.Note that you may select mp3 as the output format in the options instead of WMA.DRM is added automatically to the audio files when they are downloaded after the purchase, or during the audio CD ripping process. While that means that the audio files can be played on the system they have been downloaded to or ripped on, problems may occur when the audio files are moved to another machine.The DRM of the audio files may have been linked to a particular machine, or a particular version of Windows Media Player. This led to all kinds of issues, for instance after Windows Media Player updates, Windows upgrades, or the transfer of the audio files to another Windows PC.This meant for some users that they could not play the ripped or purchased audio files anymore because of DRM issues.Digital Rights Update ToolMicrosoft has released an application for Windows 10 that takes care of DRM related issues. The Digital Rights Update Tool was designed to remove the copy protection from WMA files. Microsoft notes that it works only for WMA audio files, and even restricts this to ripped audio files, and not those that have been purchased online.The Digital Rights Update Tool removes the copy protection you added when ripping CDs to the .wma format from within Windows Media Player. Other forms of copy protection cannot be removed.Get started by clicking theFolder button above to select your music, then click the Play button to start. Choose whether or not to make backups under Settings.I never purchased WMA audio files online, and cannot test whether the Digital Rights Update Tool works with purchased WMA files as well.The tool has a basic interface. Simply click on the folder icon of the tool to open a file browser and add WMA audio files to the application.Once done, click on the play button to start the process. You may create backups of the original files, but need to enable the option in the preferences before you start the process.Closing WordsMicrosoft released the Digital Rights Update Tool exclusively for Windows 10 devices. While it is not available for devices running older versions of Windows, you may run Windows 10 in a virtual machine to use the application on those devices as well.The tool, at least, seems to work well for audio files that you ripped using Windows Media Player. (via Born)Now You: Is audio ripping still a thing?Summary12345 Author Rating2 based on 4 votes Software Name Digital Rights Update ToolOperating System Windows 10Software Category MultimediaLanding Page https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/store/p/digital-rights-update-tool/9nblggh52q93 Advertisementlast_img read more