FiveYear Pentagon Initiative to Cut Staff Costs by 25 Percent

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR A Defense Department “delayering” initiative will trim headquarters staff costs by 25 percent in an effort to save $1.9 billion, according to David Tillotson III, DOD’s assistant deputy chief management officer.About 300 positions from the office of the secretary of Defense are being eliminated, including 243 that are filled. In defense agencies and field activities, 1,260 positions are slated for reduction. The streamlining is part of a broader reform, in which the department is restructuring its business processes and practices, particularly in support areas, Tillotson told DOD News.The restructuring will be carried out over several years, with many of the cuts being implemented through attrition. So far, officials are not making involuntary cuts, he said. The vast majority of affected workers will be placed in other positions or take voluntary actions, such as an early retirement or separation incentive payments.Last August, Deputy Defense Secretary Bob Work directed a 25 percent reduction of all appropriations funding for major DOD headquarters activities of military departments, the office of the secretary of Defense, the Joint Staff, defense agencies and field activities, and combatant commands. The restructuring covers the period from fiscal 2016 to 2020.Tillotson said the savings generated by the initiative would be shifted into modernization and improving readiness and training.last_img read more

Subaru stops two Japanese factories to address powersteering defect

first_img 45 Photos 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 0 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Subaru Subaru: Stay up-to-date on everything Subaru.Subaru STI S209: Finally, Japanese forbidden fruit comes to the US. Subaru has discovered a defect in the power-steering systems of some of its Japanese-built vehicles, and has shut down the plants briefly as it investigates the root cause.On Wednesday Subaru announced that it had idled two plants in Japan’s Gunma prefecture on Jan. 16 when it discovered a defect that may disable a vehicle’s power steering and illuminate a warning lamp. According to the automaker’s press release, it hopes to have the plant up and running again on Jan. 28.The two plants comprise a majority of Subaru’s global manufacturing, including some models destined for the US. A Subaru spokesperson said approximately 10,000 examples of the Crosstrek and Forester might be affected, but the final number may be smaller.Enlarge ImageSubaru’s Japanese plants represent an overwhelming majority of its global sales, and the company isn’t sure how the shutdown will affect its bottom line in the short term. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images The spokesperson also stressed that no affected units have reached dealers or consumers, so there won’t be a need for a recall in the US. Any vehicles en route to retailers will receive a permanent fix before going on sale. This problem does not affect Subaru vehicles built in the US at its Indiana facility.In its press release, Subaru said it’s still working to determine the cause. A loss of power steering can make turning the wheel more difficult, especially at idle. Subaru Japan recommends that Japanese owners who experience this fault should stop driving and contact a dealer. In addition to affecting the Forester and Crosstrek (called the XV) in Japan, the problem also affects the Japanese-market Impreza.Subaru suffered a scandal in Japan in 2017 when it copped to decades of “flawed” vehicle inspections. Both Subaru and Nissan admitted to using unauthorized employees in quality-control jobs, in violation of Japanese regulations. Both automakers recalled vehicles for additional inspections following their admissions. More From Roadshow Roadshow’s long-term 2019 Subaru Ascent is a big, comfy family-hauler 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Post a comment Car Industry Crossovers Subaru Tags Share your voicelast_img read more