Google to ask Android users to choose preferred browser

first_img Comments Google Samsung Alphabet Inc. Tags Phones Tech Industry Google will soon prompt Android users to choose their preferred browser. Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images Google will prompt Android users to choose their preferred web browser and search apps, a senior Google executive said Tuesday, as it tries to avoid new EU antitrust sanctions.The European Commission slapped Google with a record fine of 4.34 billion euros ($5 billion) in July over antitrust violations related to the Android mobile operating system. Google’s agreements with phone makers such as Huawei, Samsung and LG put those companies at a disadvantage because they’re completely dependent on Android, the EU said.Android users have always had the ability to install any browser they wanted, but now Google will highlight that they have other browser and search engine options.Google will do more to “ensure that Android phone owners know about the wide choice of browsers and search engines available to download to their phones,” Kent Walker, senior vice president of Google, wrote in a blog post. “This will involve asking users of existing and new Android devices in Europe which browser and search apps they would like to use.”In response to the $5 billion fine, Google said in October it would begin offering a paid license for phone and tablet manufacturers in Europe that want to include its Google Play app store, Maps, Gmail and Google-owned YouTube. Another license will let phone makers include Google’s search engine and Chrome browser.The EU’s investigation into Android dominance dates back to 2016. In June 2017, it fined Google $2.7 billion over abusing the way it prioritizes its own shopping results in search. Share your voice 4last_img read more

US centres force migrant children to take drugs

first_imgA view from Mexico of the US Customs and Border Protection is housing underage people caught illegally entering the United States at the Tornillo Port of Entry in Guadalupe Bravos, nearby Ciudad Juarez, state of Chihuahua, Mexico on 19 June 2018. Photo: AFPImmigrant children are being routinely and forcibly given a range of psychotropic drugs at US government-funded youth shelters to manage their trauma after being detained and in some cases separated from parents, according to a lawsuit.Children held at facilities such as the Shiloh Treatment Center in Texas are almost certain to be administered the drugs, irrespective of their condition, and without their parents’ consent, according to the lawsuit filed by the Los Angeles-based Center for Human Rights & Constitutional Law.The Shiloh centre, which specializes in services for children and youths with behavioral and emotional problems, did not respond immediately to a request for comment.The lawsuit was filed on April 16, days after the introduction of the Trump Administration’s “zero tolerance” policy to separate children from parents who crossed the US-Mexico border illegally. Trump abandoned the policy on Wednesday.“If you’re in Shiloh then it’s almost certain you are on these medications. So if any child were placed in Shiloh after being separated from a parent, then they’re almost certainly on psychotropics,” said Carlos Holguin, a lawyer representing the Center for Human Rights & Constitutional Law.Officials at the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), which oversees such centres, were not immediately available for comment.Taking multiple psychotropic drugs at the same time can seriously injure children, according to the filing, which highlights the need for oversight to prevent medications being used as “chemical straight jackets,” rather than treat actual mental health needs.ORR-run centres unilaterally administer the drugs to children in disregard of laws in Texas and other states that require either a parent’s consent or a court order, the filing said.The lawsuit seeks a shift in ORR policies to comply with state laws and prevent the prolonged detention of children.Some youths at Shiloh reported being given up to nine different pills in the morning and six in the evening and said they were told they would remain detained if they refused drugs, the lawsuit said.Some said they had been held down and given injections when they refused to take medication, the lawsuit said.One mother said neither she nor any other family member had been consulted about medication given to her daughter, even though Shiloh had their contact details. Another mother said her daughter received such powerful anti-anxiety medications she collapsed several times, according to the filing.last_img read more