Former Orange star Jamie Archer leads Jamesville-DeWitt boy’s lacrosse program that feeds SU

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on April 17, 2017 at 11:48 pm Contact Charlie: csdistur@syr.edu | @charliedisturco UPDATED: April 18, 2017 at 2:17 a.m.Editor’s Note: SU’s men’s lacrosse team has consistently been a national powerhouse. The Daily Orange took a look at the local high schools that feed players to the program. You can view the series here.Scott Firman started putting on his pads. The soon-to-be Jamesville-DeWitt (New York) High School sophomore was playing pickup lacrosse with his teammates. Usually his head coach, Jamie Archer, stood off on the side and watched. But one day, Archer came out with pads himself and suited up. Firman had to guard his coach, a former Syracuse All-American.“I tried to play defense on him,” said Firman, now one of the best defenders in the country. “… He had old man strength. I never believed it until I guarded him.”“I’ve retired my stuff,” Archer quipped.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe former Syracuse All-American has been the head coach of Jamesville-Dewitt’s varsity team since 2006, producing some of lacrosse’s top talent. Three current players — Firman, Jordan Evans and Connor Flanagan — on the top-ranked Orange (10-1, 4-0 Atlantic Coast) went through Archer’s program at J-D. Griffin Cook, a junior at J-D, recently committed to Syracuse. The high school is just six miles away from SU’s campus.J-D alumni at Syracuse include the Orange’s best defensive player, Firman, and offensive weapon that dons the legendary No. 22 jersey, Evans. Since graduating SU in 1993, Archer stays close to the lacrosse program as an assistant in the summer and an attendee as often as he can in the spring.“If I can help it, I don’t miss a game,” Archer said. “I go to every Syracuse game I can go to. I haven’t missed a game unless I’m out of town.”On April 8, Archer stood with his arms crossed on the sideline, analyzing his team before J-D’s game against West Genesee (New York) High School, another local feeder program for Syracuse. In the two-hour contest, Archer was relaxed throughout. He rarely spoke to the referee, and his team never trailed in an eventual 13-7 win.Evans knows that quiet confidence. “He doesn’t get out of whack,” the Syracuse senior attack said.When Evans and Firman played at J-D, they said Archer and assistant coach Bob Elmer had contrasting coaching personalities. Archer was the “good cop” and Elmer the “bad cop.”Elmer focused on the defensive side of the field and called out players, loudly, for mistakes. Archer was level-headed, critiquing players one-on-one rather than in front of the team, Evans said. But if needed, Archer stopped practice to point out errors.“(Archer’s) pretty low key and analytical in his coaching style,” Firman, a senior at Syracuse, said. “But he wasn’t afraid to be upfront and tell you that you were doing a bad job.”His analytical coaching style developed into a run-and-gun offense, a trait commonly associated with Syracuse. Archer had taken what he learned at SU and put his own spin on it: he wanted to push harder in transition and play even faster.“It’s always a transition game for us,” Archer said. “We don’t like to slow things down.”His strategy played out perfectly in the 2011 state championship game.Tied 7-7 in overtime, Garden City (New York) High School held the ball on J-D for about a minute and 20 seconds. Garden City wanted to tire out J-D and take its time finding a defensive weak point. Then, GCHS passed it to the middle for Brian Coleman and J-D sprung its double-team. Firman approached from the backside and tomahawked his stick toward the head of Coleman’s. Suddenly, the ball was on the ground.Firman scooped it up and flung to his cutting teammate, long-stick midfielder Matt Kopp. The high pass forced Kopp to extend his pole over his head on the run. And he caught it in one of the best high school plays Archer has ever seen. But J-D had only crossed the ball over midfield. Now, they needed to score.“Most coaches when you get the ball back with little time,” Evans said, “they’re going to call that timeout and try to set up some random play, but just like I said, he let us play and he let us make the plays.”Earlier in the game, Evans had slipped and fallen in a similar situation and given the ball away behind the goal. After the play, Archer pulled Evans aside on the sideline. He told his star player, who would eventually be ranked the nation’s No. 1 recruit in the nation, to forget about the turnover. He’d get another chance.Seeing Kopp on the run, Evans broke backdoor on his defender toward the goal. With three seconds left, Evans capped J-D’s perfect season with a state title. Archer received a familiar Gatorade shower.“I’ve had a couple of those,” Archer said. “(The players) win a championship with the guys you grow up with, there’s nothing better.”He’d experienced similar success as a feeding attack for SU in the early 1990s. He won the 1990 and 1993 NCAA titles after then-Syracuse assistant coach John Desko recruited him almost 30 years ago. In four seasons, Archer finished top 10 in career assists and became an All-American, like his father before him.“Lot of Orange blood runs through that family’s veins,” Desko said.Ally Moreo | Photo EditorAfter graduating from Syracuse in 1993, Archer wanted to become a gym teacher while also coaching lacrosse. He returned to his alma mater, Nottingham (New York) High School, and spent six years there before joining J-D in 2000.Archer didn’t coach at J-D right away, though, spending one last spring with his final senior class. Then, he became the junior varsity head coach for a season before becoming an assistant to long-time head coach Jim Pistello.Since 2006, when Archer took over, the Red Rams have been to six state championships, and Archer owns a career record of 218-27. In the past five years, J-D has never lost more than three times in a single season.Over the past few years, five players from Jamesville-DeWitt have ended up at Syracuse. Others have gone on to Virginia, Villanova and other schools. But none have found more success than Firman and Evans.Firman wears Syracuse’s No. 11 jersey, given to the best defender on the team. The senior transitioned from long-stick midfield to close defense this season and has limited nearly every matchup he’s faced, often the opponent’s best player, to under his season average. Six years ago, Archer had Firman, the No. 17 recruit in his class, make the same position switch in high school. That led to a seamless transition in college.“Look what Scott’s doing for us now,” Desko said. “His high school experience has helped him because he played some long stick for J-D and close defense … He’s done an unbelievable job.”Then there’s Evans. The attack wears the same No. 22 as SU legends Gary Gait and the Powell brothers. He was the No. 1 recruit in the 2013 recruiting class and led J-D to undefeated seasons in 2010 and 2011. He lost six times in four years.The IQ that analysts praise Evans for now originated from J-D and Archer. A lot of that knowledge came from study sessions, practice and one-on-ones with Archer.“I was really close with him,” Evans said. “He wasn’t afraid to go hard on me. With him allowing me to try to make plays, it also came with ‘You shouldn’t be trying to do that’ … There’s a time and place for everything and sometimes you’re going to try to overdo it.”Archer still texts Firman and Evans before games because he wants to keep close with his former players. But that’s as far as he usually goes. He lets Desko and the SU coaching staff handle the coaching, unless he thinks he can help.But he likes just offering pointers. Archer said he wants to stay put at Jamesville-DeWitt for the foreseeable future, because while jumping to the collegiate level of coaching comes with a bigger paycheck, there’s less job security and higher stakes.“I’m pretty convinced he can be a very effective college coach,” Firman said. “He prepared us like we were a college team in terms of scouting, giving us a look at their offense and knowing their players.”But Archer, for now, remains interested in dominating New York high school lacrosse. Just like he has the past 11 years. And maybe a few more of his players will end up playing in college just down the road.View part one of the series hereCORRECTION: In a previous version of this post, Jamie Archer was misidentified in the dominant photo. The Daily Orange regrets this error. Commentslast_img read more

WHS Daily Bulletin: Come tryout for the 2015-16 Cheer Squad

first_img*Leadership and SADD will be hosting a Dodge ball Tournament the afternoon of March 4th for $10 per team; 5 on a team.  We will also be hosting a talent show on that same day – $5 for an individual to perform; $10 for a group to perform.  Deadline to sign up for both of these events is February 25.  Students wishing to watch either event may do so for $1.  Sign up sheets for the talent show are outside the Choir Room, outside room 208, outside Officer Yunker’s office and in the main office.  The Sign up sheet for the dodge ball tournament is in the main office. *Special K Basketball has a home game today@ 12:45. Student’s can pay $1.00 at the door to watch. Students must go to their sixth block class and will be dismissed via intercom. *Senior girls: If you did not get a PEO scholarship application on Tuesday, you may pick one up in the counselor’s office.center_img Submitted to Sumner Newscow — Today’s Wellington High School bulletin for Friday, Feb. 20, 2015:Friday• Special K Basketball 12:45• Basketball: Wellington home  vs.  Collegiate• Regional Wrestling at Pratt, 2 p.m.Saturday• Regional Wrestling at PrattFriday lunch: Chicken patty/bun, oven fries, baked beans, oatmeal cookie, mandarin oranges.Monday lunch: Hamburger/bun, romaine and tomato, oven fries, mixed fruit, chocolate chip cookie.Today’s news: *Come Try-out for the 2015-2016 Cheer Squad! Cheer Clinic will be held on March 11-12 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Main Gym and Tryouts will be on Friday, March 13 at 10 a.m. You will need to pick up a try-out packet in the office before tryouts. If you have any questions, please see Mrs. Lawrence in the office.last_img read more

Frontline Eyes Up to USD 100 Mn from ATM Equity Offering

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license John Fredriksen-controlled tanker owner and operator Frontline has entered into an equity distribution agreement with Morgan Stanley for the offer and sale of up to USD 100 million of its common shares.In line with the deal, the company may offer and sell its common shares at any time and from time to time through Morgan Stanley as its sales agent. Frontline added that the sales of the common shares will be made by means of ordinary brokers’ transactions on NYSE or otherwise at market prices prevailing at the time of sale.The company plans to use the net proceeds to fund growth opportunities and capital expenditures, including the purchase exhaust gas cleaning systems that reduce sulfur emissions to comply with upcoming implementation of new IMO standards.The move is being announced following Frontline-s memorandum of agreement (MOA) to acquire a 20 percent ownership interest in Feen Marine Scrubbers, a manufacturer of exhaust gas cleaning systems.Pursuant to the MOA, Frontline will order FMSI exhaust gas cleaning systems for 14 vessels, with options to order an additional 22 systems at fixed prices. According to Robert Hvide Macleod, CEO of Frontline Management, the economic case to install scrubbers is very compelling, particularly for larger vessels.“Scrubbers installed on existing vessels provide the same benefit as those delivered from the yard on newbuildings and our solution comes at a much cheaper cost,” he explained commenting on the deal.Feen Marine says that its open-loop scrubber system reduces sulphur emissions to 0.1 pct and offers payback period on investment of 6 to 18 months. The company also has a hybrid system in its portfolio which can switch from open loop to closed loop mode of operation.Ships using exhaust gas cleaning technology will be able to continue to use high sulphur fuel oil (HSFO) as a marine fuel after global sulphur cap becomes mandatory in 2020. The regulation requires that all ships trading outside of the sulphur Emission Control Areas (ECAs) start using fuel with a sulphur content of up to 0.5 pct, a considerable reduction from the currently permitted maximum of 3.5 pct.last_img read more

Ed Asner Attends 2nd Annual AutFest Film Festival

first_imgSONY Pictures Entertainment, ABC’s The Good Doctor, Netflix’s Atypical, and several filmmakers were honored for their contributions to autism awareness “From Spectrum to Screen” by the Autism Society of America at the 2nd Annual AutFest International Film Festival (April 28-29), held at the Writers Guild Theater in Beverly Hills.Ed Asner at 2nd Annual AutFest Film FestivalCredit/Copyright: Mathew ImagingAutFest screened over 16 feature films, shorts and television programs that promote autism awareness and/or are made by autistic filmmakers.Seven-time Emmy winner and autism advocate Ed Asner presented SONY Pictures Entertainment with the AutFest Visionary Award, bestowed upon Jeff Frost, President of Sony Pictures Television Studios, and Co-Presidents of Sony Pictures Television Chris Parnell and Jason Clodfelter at the festival’s closing reception. ABC’s The Good Doctor and Netflix’s Atypical received Spotlight Awards, honored for their exceptional portrayal of autism in a positive light to help increase understanding and acceptance of people on the spectrum.Prior to the reception, cast and crew of Netflix’s Atypical participated in a Q&A moderated by PEOPLE reporter Kara Warner after a screening of two episodes. Participating in the panel were Creator Robia Rashid (Will & Grace, How I Met Your Mother), Oscar-nominated actress Jennifer Jason Leigh (The Hateful Eight), Brigette Lundy-Paine (Downsizing, The Glass Castle), Keir Gilchrist (It’s Kind of a Funny Story), Nik Dodani (Kevin from Work), Layla Weiner and Nikki Gutman; Executive Producers Mary Rohlich (Gleason, Baywatch); Author David Finch (The Journal of Best Practices) and Autism Consultant Michelle Dean (Ph.D. Special Education, UCLA).Following the Atypical panel, ABC’s The Good Doctor screened one episode and held a panel/Q&A immediately following. Emmy-winning Executive Producer David Shore (House, Sneaky Pete), Emmy-winning actor Richard Schiff (The West Wing, Ballers), Nicholas Gonzalez (How to Get Away with Murder, Pretty Little Liars, Narcos) and Autism Consultant Melissa Reiner (Md.Ed) participated, also moderated by Kara Warner, PEOPLE.Additional highlights of the festival included a Power Rangers screening, followed by a panel with Actor RJ Cyler, who plays Billy Cranston, an autistic nerd and the super hero Blue Ranger. Oscar-nominated Executive Producer/Writer John Gatins (Flight) joined the panel, moderated by Director/Producer Kevin Tenney. The panel was met with a huge ovation from the audience as the Blue Power Ranger character (RJ Cyler) is the first super hero to be depicted as autistic.The film Please Stand By screening was followed by a panel with Director Ben Lewin (The Sessions), Writer Michael Golcamo (Grimm) and Autism Consultant Elaine Hall (The Miracle Project, Fly Away), moderated by Matt Asner, AutFest founder and Autism Society’s VP of Development.“AutFest is proud to honor SONY Pictures Entertainment and outstanding television shows Atypical and The Good Doctor for their cinematic and television contributions reflecting the autism community in a positive light,” said Matt Asner. “We are touched by the overwhelming support of the entertainment and autism communities and look forward to this annual event.”Over six feature films and eight short films and two television series were presented during the two-day festival that included Roman J. Israel Esq, Barfi, Dina and Randy’s Canvas. Two of the shorts, The Girl Inside and Big Mouth were written and directed by filmmakers on the autism spectrum. A special panel addressing “Love and Relationships” followed the Barfi screening. For more information, visit autfestasa.com or follow @AutFest on Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat.The 2nd Annual AutFest International Film Festival winners include:Best Film:Randy’s Canvas, directed by Sean Michael Beyer (U.S.A.)Best Documentary:Dina, directed by Antonio Santini and Dan Sickles (U.S.A.)Best Short:Sisterly, directed by Nina Vallado (U.S.A.)Best PerformanceAdam Carbone, Randy’s Canvas (U.S.A.)Best Autistic Filmmaker:Abbey Romeo, The Girl Inside (U.S.A.)Celebrities including Emmy-nominated actor Gary Cole (Veep), Oscar-nominated actor Robert Forster (Jackie Brown), Denise Grayson (Social Network) and Johnny Dowers (The Bridge) were on hand to attend the festival’s closing festivities.In attendance were Autism Society of America’s Joe Joyce, Chairman, Board of Directors; Scott Badesch, President and CEO; and Lori Ireland, Vice Chair, Board of Directors. AutFest Honorary Committee Members include seven-time Emmy winner and autism advocate Ed Asner, actress Kristen Bell (House of Lies), actor Dax Shepard (CHIPS), Emmy-winning actress comedian Sarah Silverman, Golden Globe-nominated actor Matthew Modine (Stranger Things), Emmy-nominated actor Gary Cole (Veep), Autism Speaks co-founder Bob Wright, The Suzanne Wright Foundation president Liz Feld, Warner Bros.AutFest 2018 is proudly sponsored by GOLD: Hyundai, State of Qatar, Sony Pictures, Entertainment; SILVER: Ainsworth Pet Nutrition, Lindamood Belle, Netflix; FRIENDS OF THE FESTIVAL: ABC, Autism Pie, Bob Wright, Center for Developing Minds, ICM, Saban, SAG-Aftra;TRIBUTE BOOK: PCW Props, Shuman Management; MEDIA SPONSORS: ABC, Variety, INKIND: Foreo, MAC Cosmetics, One-Hope Wine, Penta Water, Runway Tech, Sevenly, Sprouts; GIFTBAG: Art by Luis, Designs by Siri, Lindamood Belle, Thikkun Spalast_img read more