Bernard Tomic in ‘tough place’, offered support by Tennis Australia

first_imgAustralian tennis player Bernard Tomic, who was once mooted as a rising star of the sport, has been offered “health and well-being” support at a time when the career of the struggling tennis star is at the crossroads.The 25-year-old’s disastrous year, which was topped by his defeat against French qualifier Pierre-Hugues Herbert at the Vienna Open last week, saw him slump to the 145th in the rankings.As a result of the forgettable season, Tomic would not have enough points to qualify directly for the first major of the season i.e Australian Open.Tomic, who had admitted that he was “bored” and not always giving 100 percent in his recent season, is now reliant on being handed a wildcard for his home Grand Slam in January.And the Tennis Australia has decided to offer help to Tomic, with tournament director Craig Tiley saying that the sport was doing what it could to help him, but admitted he had not responded to their offers.”We have reached out to Bernie from a health and well-being point of view and it’s up to him to respond.We have been reaching out to him … he is in a tough place right now. His ranking has dropped and he is struggling – we have all seen it,” Sport24 quoted Tomic, as saying.”Our job as a federation is to make sure we have a team of people there to support beyond tennis and that is where we are at. He did not detail what assistance had been offered, but said “our athlete department has a group of people that support athletes that need help,” he added.advertisementEarlier this year, Tomic had said that he had no love for the game, saying that it is just a job and he felt “trapped”.last_img read more

Caribbean Islands Begin Preparations For Hurricane Irma

first_imgNASA/NOAA via APThis enhanced satellite image made available by the NOAA GOES Project shows Irma, in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean on Saturday, Sept. 2, 2017 at 1:45 p.m. In the wake of Harvey, meteorologists are already looking warily at another system: Hurricane Irma, which intensified from a tropical storm to a major hurricane in just 30 hours, is steadily moving west across the Atlantic.Islands at the eastern end of the Caribbean Sea made preparations Sunday for approaching Hurricane Irma, a Category 3 storm that could threaten the area beginning Tuesday.Hurricane watches were posted for Antigua and Barbuda, Anguilla, Monserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Martin, Guadeloupe and the British Virgin Islands.The U.S. National Hurricane Center said the storm could near that region late Tuesday. It said islands farther north, including the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, should monitor the progress of the storm.The Antigua and Barbuda weather service said Irma was expected to bring heavy rains, rough surf and high winds to islands along the northern edge of the Antilles.Long-range forecasts indicated Irma likely would curve to the northwest beginning late Monday and skirt to the north of those islands on a path that could potentially take it to the U.S. East Coast, but it was too early to make a definitive prediction.Antigua’s prime minister, Gaston Browne, urged people to take preventative measures in case the storm should hit, including cleaning drains and removing objects that could be sent airborne by high winds. Workers began pruning trees and shrubs to reduce chances for branches to tear down power and phone lines.“The passage of a hurricane is not a matter to be taken lightly, but we must not panic,” Browne said in a statement.The U.S. hurricane center said Irma had maximum sustained winds of 115 mph (185 kph) Sunday night and some strengthening was expected over the next two days. The storm was centered about 710 miles (1,145 kilometers) east of the Leeward Islands and moving west-southwest at 14 mph (22 kph).Puerto Rico’s governor, Ricard Rossello, said government agencies in the U.S. territory were prepared to deal with any emergencies caused by the storm.“We have established protocols for the safety of all,” he said at a news conference, while he also urged islanders to take precautions.In the Dominican Republic, Public Works Minister Gonzalo Castillo said workers there were clear away road works and also clean out blockages of sewer drains. He said President Danilo Medina would lead a meeting with emergencies agencies on Monday to discuss storm preparations. Sharelast_img read more

New invisibility cloak allows object to see out through the cloak

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — “Many groups have been working devices that make objects invisible,” Che Ting Chan tells PhysOrg.com. “Most of these devices, however, encompass the object to be cloaked.” Chan, a scientist at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, believes that it is possible to create a cloaking device that would be able to render an object invisible without encompassing it. “With the devices that encompass the object,” Chan continues, “the cloaked subject is ‘blind’. It can’t ‘see’ out through the cloak. We can’t see the object, but the object can’t see us, either. We wanted to create a conceptual design that would let the object ‘see’ out through the cloak while hiding it from sight.” Along with Yun Lai, Huanyang Chen and Zhao-Qing Zhang, Chan believes that this could be accomplished. Their ideas are published in Physical Review Letters: “Complementary Media Invisibility Cloak that Cloaks Objects at a Distance Outside the Cloaking Shell.”Right now, such a device exists only theory. “We haven’t built the device,” Chan says, “but we have shown mathematically how it could work. It is a very specific description of the materials needed. If you have the time and resources, we think it could be done.” He points out that it might have interesting possibilities in a number of fields where invisibility might be desirable. Theoretically, a device such as Chan suggests, would work through complementary media. “Our strategy is to put the cloaking device and the object to be cloak next to each other. The cloaking device is a kind of anti-object. The way the light is gathered and scattered by the two objects – the cloaking device and the object it is making invisible – would cancel each other out.” Chan continues by explaining that the cloaking device would become invisible as well. “Both must be invisible in order for this to be effective, and I think we have shown in theory how this could work.”Chan admits that 100 percent invisibility is only available for one wavelength, however. “Right now, the usefulness, especially for military applications, is limited,” he says. “You can only make the object invisible in one wavelength, so if I made it invisible for the visible spectrum, all someone would have to do is use radar to detect the object. A lot of work would need to be done to make a cloaking device that worked for more wavelengths.” He pauses, before adding, “It might be possible to make the object almost invisible for broader wavelengths, but that would also take a lot of work. And you still wouldn’t have 100 percent visibility.”The Hong Kong team, although interested in rendering objects invisible, is working on another ambitious project. “We have shown that we can cause invisibility in objects, and allow them to ‘see’ out of the cloak,” he says. “We are now working on how to transform how an object looks. Invisibility was just the first step in this. By understanding how complementary media invisibility might work, we can also look at how it might be possible to transform the look of an object into something else. Perhaps make an apple look like a banana.”Science is beginning to sound more like magic by the day.More information: Yun Lai, Huanyang Chen, Zhao-Qing Zhang, and C. T. Chan, “Complementary Media Invisibility Cloak that Cloaks Objects at a Distance Outside the Cloaking Shell.” Physical Review Letters (2009). Available online: link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.093901 . Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Invisibility undone: Chinese scientists demonstrate how to uncloak an invisible object Explore furthercenter_img Citation: New invisibility cloak allows object to ‘see’ out through the cloak (2009, March 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-03-invisibility-cloak.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more