Ohio State Freshman Suspended For Season Opener

first_imgUrban Meyer rallying his team up before a game.COLUMBUS, OH – SEPTEMBER 12: Head Coach Urban Meyer of the Ohio State Buckeyes rallies his team during the pregame warmups before taking on Hawaii at Ohio Stadium on September 12, 2015 in Columbus, Ohio. (Photo by Jamie Sabau/Getty Images)Last month, Ohio State freshman defensive back Marcus Hooker was arrested for DUI. Today, Urban Meyer announced Hooker’s punishment.Hooker will be suspended for the season opener against Oregon State on Sept. 1. The three-star recruit will be eligible to play starting in Week 2 against Rutgers.Hooker, a New Castle, Pa. native, was arrested by Neshannock Township police on in late June.“Marcus James Hooker, 18, of New Castle, by Neshannock Township police with driving under the influence, disregarding traffic lane, careless driving, no rear lights and purchase of alcoholic beverage by a minor,” read the original report.Ohio State safety Marcus Hooker will be suspended for the first game of the season after his DUI arrest this summer.— Dan Hope (@Dan_Hope) July 24, 2018Hooker was the 60th-rated cornerback and 20th-rated player in Pennsylvania in the 2018 class, according to 247Sports’ Composite Rankings. He will begin his OSU career at safety.The 6-foot, 185-pound Hooker is the younger brother of former Ohio State star and current Indianapolis Colts defensive back Malik Hooker.Ohio State’s season opener against Oregon State is set for noon ET at Ohio Stadium.The game will be televised on ABC.last_img read more

UBC board of governors votes against divestment from fossil fuel industry

Facebook: UBCC350 VANCOUVER – The University of British Columbia has rejected calls from students and faculty to dump its holdings in the fossil fuel industry, instead promising to create a low-carbon investment fund.The board of governors voted Monday in favour of a motion from its finance committee not to divest and instead establish a so-called sustainable future fund. The fund would include a mandate for low-carbon emissions and be seeded with an initial allocation of $10 million.Getting rid of certain investments is permissible, said finance committee chairman Greg Peet shortly before the vote, but “the universal exclusion of a legally-operating industry that provides irreplaceable goods and services is not.”Peet said aggressive screening criteria for the new fund will result in the divestment of numerous fossil fuel companies.Investments tied to oil, gas and coal companies make up about 10 per cent of the university’s $1.4-billion endowment. Divestment has been an ongoing issue for several years, with students and staff voting separately in favour of pushing fossil fuels out of UBC’s portfolio.Peet told the board Monday that the proposal from staff and students did not make a “compelling case” that divestment would have a meaningful impact on climate change through a moral or political message.He said UBC’s sustainable future fund would have a similar effect to a recommendation made by an advisory committee at the University of Toronto, which called for divestment from fossil fuel companies that “blatantly disregard” efforts to combat climate change.Of the three student representatives on the board, two opposed the motion not to divest and one abstained. The remainder of the board voted in favour.Campus-based environmental advocacy group Divest UBC had circulated a letter calling for a transparent, open and evidence-based consideration of divestment.Spokesman Alex Hemingway told the board that the committee considering the issue refused to meet with his group and only invited it to the final meeting last week.His statements prompted an apology from finance committee member Richard Johnston, who promised the consultation process would be fixed.After the vote, several members of Divest UBC, who were wearing black and carrying anti-fossil fuel signs, stood and chanted in unison, “You are failing us.”Hemingway said after the vote that he was extremely disappointed. He said there are indications the sustainable future fund will continue to invest in coal companies.“We need strong, dramatic action on climate change now, not a drop-in-the-bucket fund.”In 2014, UBC students voted 77 per cent in support of divestment. Last year, faculty voted 62 per cent in favour of selling off the school’s fossil fuel holdings within five years.Concordia University in Montreal became the first Canadian university to adopt a partial divestment policy in December 2014, though that measure only applies to a $5-million fund — a fraction of the school’s $130-million endowment.The University of Calgary, McGill University in Montreal and Dalhousie University in Halifax have all decided against divestment. The University of Toronto’s president is expected to make a final decision by April.— Follow @ellekane on Twitter. by Laura Kane, The Canadian Press Posted Feb 15, 2016 10:51 am MDT Last Updated Feb 15, 2016 at 3:35 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email UBC board of governors votes against divestment from fossil fuel industry read more