Council stiil ‘wasting’ 500 euro per meeting on paper having already spent 15K…

first_img Pinterest It has been revealed for every meeting of Donegal County Council 500 euro is spent on paper.This despite 15 thousand euro being spent on tablets for councillors at the start of the current council’s term.The council has expressed its intention to move to paperless meetings but no timeframe for that move has been announced.The figures were revealed to Councillor Jimmy Kavanagh – he says the sooner the meetings go totally electronic the better:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/jimm1PAPER.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Facebook Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic By News Highland – January 27, 2015 Council stiil ‘wasting’ 500 euro per meeting on paper having already spent 15K on Tablets Twittercenter_img Facebook Previous articleDonegal beauty spots stand out in new Wild Atlantic Way drone footageNext article28 patients either on trolleys or in wards at Letterkenny Hospital News Highland Google+ Google+ Homepage BannerNews WhatsApp Twitter Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

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Humboldt State football opens practice with eyes fully set on Sept. 1 opener in Tennessee

first_imgARCATA >> Rob Smith and the Humboldt State football team entered the 2015 season knowing not only would his team have a full-length preseason camp, but also no worries of opening-week travel.Simply put, the Jacks got to prep for Week 1 in the comfort of their own home while having the competition come to them.Things are wee bit different this time around.The Jacks not only have to deal with the fact that their season opens a few days earlier than pretty much everybody else in Division II, …last_img read more

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Missouri River Floods Debate

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Chris ClaytonDTN Ag Policy EditorGLENWOOD, Iowa (DTN) — Congress appropriating funds for Midwest levee repair doesn’t necessarily mean that’s where the money would go if the Army Corps of Engineers and the White House use cost-benefit analysis to decide which levees to rebuild first.That was one of the key takeaways for four U.S. senators who held a field hearing here on Wednesday for the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee on the current state of Missouri River flooding.The flooding has caused an estimated $1.6 billion in damage in Iowa, which includes millions of dollars in grain that was stored from last harvest. Congressional funding would be required to provide an indemnity for the damaged grain.Blake Hurst, president of the Missouri Farm Bureau, representing the Coalition to Protect the Missouri River, said northwest Missouri has about 187,000 acres under water, none of which will be planted this spring. Crops lost just from unplanted acres will top well over $100 million, he said.Despite the damage incurred in Nebraska from the flooding, there were no witnesses to highlight the destruction or rebuilding challenges there.MAGNITUDE OF DESTRUCTIONMajor Gen. Scott Spellmon, deputy commanding general for the Army Corps of Engineers Civil and Emergency Operations, told senators the current flood topped 32 federal levee systems or put them completely underwater, as well as causing 114 other breaches in levees. Highlighting the magnitude of the destruction, he said even to plug just two levees near Hamburg, Iowa, will take 100,000 dump trucks of material.Seeking to counter repeated complaints that other priorities dominate the Corps’ management of the river, Spellmon emphasized, “The No. 1 priority of the Corps in its operations is life and public safety.”Spellmon pointed out there was little the Corps could do in and around March 13-17 to control the water flowing throughout Nebraska. The Niobrara River, for instance, normally runs at 4,000 cubic feet per second. At its peak, the Niobrara was sending 180,000 cfs straight into the Missouri River.Spellmon also added that so much of the flooding occurred in unregulated rivers downstream from the Missouri River dams, such as the Platte River. The sheer volume of water in these rivers overwhelmed the levee system. The six upstream dams could not have prevented this, he said.“Even if flood control were the only authorized purpose for these six projects (dams) and they were all empty, this event still would have occurred,” Spellmon said. He cited the meteorological event, dubbed a “bomb cyclone,” that put water on top of snow — on top of frozen ground — which quickly went into tributaries, “and frankly just overwhelmed the design capacity of the levee system below the federal projects (dams).”REVISIT RECOMMENDATIONSGiven the response to this flood, Spellmon said it’s time to revisit 97 recommendations made after the 1993 flooding on the Missouri and Mississippi rivers. “We think it’s time to revisit some of these recommendations that have been brought to the basin before,” Spellmon said. He later added, “The solutions to reduce flood risks on the upper basin and the lower basin are not new.”Most of those recommendations required changes in law, and most of them were ignored, largely because they would reduce local development in flood plains.While senators and others who testified called for higher levee protection and more levees, Spellmon also noted the Corps currently has a $98 billion backlog of unfunded projects, of which roughly one-third are flood-control projects.Hamburg, Iowa, Mayor Cathy Crain testified about having to take down a 13-foot emergency levee after the flood of 2011 that saved her town. To make the levee permanent and up to Corps standards, the town would have needed to raise $5.6 million, which it could not do. Now, 30% of the town’s homes and nearly 90% of businesses are underwater, which Crain said could have been avoided if the emergency levee had been there. Hamburg right now effectively has few local services.FEW LOCAL SERVICES LEFT“No restaurant, gas station, hair salon, barbershop, parts store, drug store, grain elevator, insurance office, bank, motel or farm implement dealership can open,” Crain said. She added, “We must have a permanent levee solution.”Crain added there are people in her town living in cars, and they have had little or no contact with the Federal Emergency Management Agency about helping homes or businesses. She fears some families and businesses have permanently left town. “They have lost their businesses and their homes and they just need help,” she said.Also testifying was Leo Ettleman, a Fremont County, Iowa, farmer, who is one of hundreds of plaintiffs in a five-year court battle with the Corps of Engineers over the 2011 flooding. Ettleman said he thinks 2004 changes in how the Corps manages the river now have led to more flooding. Part of the 2004 manual includes the Missouri River Recovery Plan (MRRP), which is meant to help recover endangered fish and bird habitat on the river.“I believe those changes in the MRRP have played a significant role in increasing the frequency of flooding,” Ettleman said.Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, who chaired the hearing, said afterward that Congress needs to spell out that flood control supersedes other functions for the Corps of Engineers. Despite the testimony, Ernst said she believes the Corps puts too much emphasis on environmental protections for endangered species over the lives and property of people.“That really needs to be the No. 1 priority, and we need to give that guidance to the Corps of Engineers that it remains the No. 1 priority,” Ernst said. “We need to make sure that flood control, flood-protection services remains the priority.”Sen Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, said he understands the Corps may need $10 billion to repair the federal levees. “But that doesn’t address the need for higher and bigger structures,” Grassley said.CORPS OFFICIALS CHALLENGEDGrassley challenged Corps officials over management of the Missouri River, maintaining that the change in the Missouri River’s master manual in 2004 started to spark an unprecedented time of floods in the river basin that had not occurred as frequently as before.“What’s wrong with the 2004 manual when 40 years before that we didn’t have the troubles we’ve experienced lately?” Grassley said.Grassley, too, said he took the comments of farmers and others who have been hurt by floods over the Corps’ comments Wednesday.While senators stressed river management changes to provide better flood control, when it comes to funding the Corps, the biggest concern now is reestablishing the levees that were there.Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kan., expressed concern about Corps testimony regarding flood protection. At other times, other priorities take place. “Everybody I’ve talked to said it’s just their priority in advance of a flood,” he said.PRIORITIES FOR REBUILDING LEVEESSenators also questioned the “cost-benefit ratio” that the White House Office of Management and Budget applies to the Corps for rebuilding levees. If funding is set aside for levee reconstruction, it could go to rebuild levees in other parts of the country where the property values are higher. This issue was highlighted by Corps officials during testimony.“That’s a terribly damaging circumstance,” Moran said, quoting testimony, “that people have built their lives around that flood protection, the value of their land is determined by that flood protection, and if we don’t repair the levees, these farmers and landowners no longer have a livelihood around the Missouri River.”Ernst reiterated that problem because Midwest property values are significantly lower than higher-value properties in the East or West Coast, she said.Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., a Democratic presidential candidate, said Congress needs “to get past the partisan politics that have come to dominate Washington, especially when it comes to funding for communities after disasters.” Gillibrand also warned of future flooding events due to more extreme weather brought on by climate change.“There will be a next time. There will be more extreme rainfalls. There will be more extreme weather. Climate change is taking extreme rare disasters and making them more common,” Gillibrand said.Gillibrand also challenged the Corps’ reaction and preventive measures for floods. “They are too slow, too bureaucratic and they don’t have enough money.” Cuts take away the ability of the Corps for prevention and flood relief.Each of the senators stressed the need to pass an emergency appropriations bill, which would boost aid for several disasters. Different House and Senate versions of that bill remain tied up in the Senate because of the new Midwest disaster and funding for Puerto Rico from a 2017 hurricane.Chris Clayton can be reached at [email protected] him on Twitter @ChrisClaytonDTN(BAS/SK)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Google, Eyebeam and What We Pay For Team Up to Sponsor Data Visualization Contest

first_imgTags:#APIs#hack 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… You can find more examples here. How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoid Related Posts center_img klint finley What We Pay For is a simple website that lets you enter your income and filing status and find out how your tax dollars are being spent. It breaks down the amount you’re likely to pay in taxes by various spending categories, such as Social Security, national defense and Medicare.The developers behind What We Pay For have released an API for the service, and Google and the non-profit organization Eyebeam are sponsoring a contest for visualizations based on the site’s data. The contest opened today and will close on March 27, 2011. First prize, chosen by a jury, will receive $5,000. Not a huge sum, especially after you subtract taxes, but it’s more than I’m getting back this year. And really, many worthwhile projects could come out of using the What We Pay For API, regardless of the contest.Here’s a screenshot from an interactive visualization that Google built: Why You Love Online Quizzeslast_img read more

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La Liga is extraordinary – Atletico Madrid boss

first_imgAtletico Madrid boss Diego Simeone has hailed La Liga, describing it as an ‘extraordinary’ division, despite Atletico Madrid dropping points to Villarreal on Saturday.Atleti was in the lead through Filipe Luis but left La Ceramica with a 1-1 draw following Mario Gaspar goal equalisation for Villarreal, while on the other hand, Jan Oblak pulled off several stops to ensure the score level.“La Liga is extraordinary, fantastic,” the Coach said after the game via Football Espana.“All the teams fight and battle, and it allows for a much more competitive League than when Ronaldo and Messi defined it.“It was a tough and intense game against a team who found themselves in a complicated situation, and we knew they’d react.Gerard Pique, Neymar, BarcelonaLa Liga Betting: Match-day 4 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Despite it being very early into La Liga season, both Barcelona and Real Madrid have had unprecedented starts to their campaigns. With this in…“We tried to make it a physical match in the first half, while in the second one we pushed on for the winner.“However it was tough like it always is here. It’s always been tight. We took the lead and our changes made us more lively, but our opponents grew.“They have quality and they’re a team who should be higher in the table. We weren’t surprised by what happened, they’re a difficult team to face and this is a complicated place to play.“I brought Thomas on to give us more dynamism as I thought he could combine better with Correa and Lemar.”last_img read more

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JJ Abrams and his son are making a SpiderMan miniseries

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