World Cup 1975: The birth of World Cups and West Indies’ dominance

first_imgWorld Cup 1975: The birth of World Cups and West Indies’ dominanceWest Indies claimed their title as the first-ever World Cup winners in 1975 when they defeated Australia by 17 runs in the final at Lord’s.advertisement India Today Web Desk New DelhiMay 28, 2019UPDATED: May 28, 2019 21:23 IST West Indies get crowned as the winners of the first ever World Cup, marking their dominance in the game (Photo: Getty Images)The 1975 World Cup was the genesis of modern One Day International (ODI) cricket as thousands of enthusiastic fans turned up in numbers to have a look at the gentlemen’s game in its brand-new avatar. The tournament took place in England and was accompanied with a lot of excitement thanks to the novelty factor surrounding the first-ever abridged version of the game. Eight participants comprising Australia, England, West Indies, India, Pakistan, New Zealand, Sri Lanka and a composite team from East Africa, were separated into two groups of four.Players took to the field wearing traditional white flannels, used a red ball and had to field for a maximum of 60 overs. The first-ever ODI and opening match of the competition pitted hosts England against India in what was a historic day in the annals of the game. The game, itself, was a rather forgetful occasion as teams took time to come to terms with cricket’s newest format. Eventually, India lost to England by 202 runs at Lord’s but the technically astute Sunil Gavaskar’s 36 not out off 174 balls is what many remember this match for.Perhaps the best match from the inaugural edition of the World Cup was West Indies’ humdinger against Pakistan at Edgbaston. It was an ebb-and-flow encounter that saw the tide turn in both sides’ favour, multiple times in the contest. In the end, it was wicket-keeper Deryck Murray and pacer Andy Roberts’ 10th-wicket partnership that got West Indies over the finish line. Chasing a target of 267, all hope seemed lost when Pakistan reduced the Windies to 203 for 9. However, Murray and Roberts demonstrated their unflappable temperament and held their nerve to win the game with a wicket and two balls to spare.advertisementWest Indies’ win over Pakistan may have lit up the World Cup, but hosts England were still very much the favourites following wins in all their group games. England’s World Cup dream though came to an end in the semi-final courtesy of a remarkable all-round performance by Australia’s Gary Gilmour. After restricting England to a mere 93, Gilmour scored an unbeaten 28 to help the Aussies to a 4-wicket win and lead them to the final. Gilmour had earlier claimed six English wickets and finished with figures of 6 for 14, which was the best bowling figures in this World Cup.However, the Australians ran out of steam once up against the West Indies in the final at Lord’s. Rohan Kanhai’s 55 and skipper Clive Lloyd’s 102 helped Windies set a target of 292 for the Aussies to chase. Gilmour once again delivered for Australia with figures of 5 for 48, but it wasn’t enough to deny the West Indians the inaugural World Cup. Keith Boyce and Lloyd both took four scalps each in the second innings as the Windies won by 17 runs to become cricket’s first-ever World Champions. Lloyd was rightfully adjudged the Man of the Match after the game as West Indies began their era of dominance.Also Read | World Cup 2011: India end Australia’s dominance, crowned champions at homeAlso SeeFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAkshay Ramesh Tags :Follow World Cup 1975Follow west indiesFollow ODIlast_img read more

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UNbacked treaty on mercury to enter into force pivotal moment in combat

“The Minamata Convention demonstrates a global commitment to protecting human health and the environment.” said Secretary General, António Guterres in a press statement. “Today’s action shows how problems that affect us all can also bring us together for the common good.”Having been signed by 128 countries, the Minamata Convention on Mercury will come into force in 90 days – on 16 August 2017 – after being ratified by Bulgaria, Denmark, Hungary, Malta, the Netherlands, Romania and Sweden. According to the UN Environmental Programme (UNEP), the Convention commits governments to specific measures to control the entire “lifecycle” of man-made mercury pollution, one of the world’s top ten chemical threats to health. This includes banning new mercury mines, phasing-out existing ones, regulating artisanal and small-scale gold mining, and reducing emissions and mercury use. Since the element is indestructible, the Convention also stipulates conditions for interim storage and disposal of mercury waste. UNEP also pointed out that there are no safe levels of exposure to mercury and everyone is at risk because the dangerous heavy metal has spread to the remotest parts of the earth and can be found in everyday products, including cosmetics, lightbulbs, batteries and teeth fillings. Children, newborn and unborn babies are most vulnerable, along with populations who eat contaminated fish, those who use mercury at work, and people who live near of a source of mercury pollution or in colder climates where the dangerous heavy metal tends to accumulate. “Who wants to live in a world where putting on makeup, powering our phones and even buying a wedding ring depends on exposing millions of people to the risk of mercury poisoning?” said UN Environment chief Erik Solheim.“But with mercury we have solutions that are as obvious as the problem itself. There are alternatives to all of mercury’s current applications, such as newer, safer industrial processes. Big and small countries can all play a role – as can the man and woman in the street, just by changing what they buy and use,” he added. Up to 8,900 metric tonnes of mercury are emitted each year. It can be released naturally through the weathering of mercury-containing rocks, forest fires and volcanic eruptions, but significant emissions also come from human processes, particularly coal burning and artisanal and small-scale gold mining. Mining alone exposes up to 15 million workers in 70 different countries to mercury poisoning, including child labourers. Other man-made sources of mercury pollution include the production of chlorine and some plastics, waste incineration and use of mercury in laboratories, pharmaceuticals, preservatives, paints and jewellery. Taking its name from the most severe mercury poisoning disaster in history, in 1956 local villages suffered convulsions, psychosis, loss of consciousness and coma from eating the fish in Minamata Bay, Japan, in which industrial wastewaters had been dumped since the 1930s. Thousands of people were certified as having directly suffered from mercury poisoning, now known as Minamata disease. read more

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